Representation of the Spoken Mode in Fiction: How Authors Write How People Talk

Author: Moreno, Carolina P. Amador and Ana Nunes
Moreno, Carolina P. Amador and Ana Nunes
Year:2009
Pages:244
ISBN:0-7734-4677-X
978-0-7734-4677-9
Price:199.95
The book is a cross-disciplinary, multi-genre study of spoken features of language in fiction whose aim is to examine not only how oral strategies are used in fictional discourse, but also the functions of those oral strategies. The volume covers a broad range of genres including the novel, autobiography, theatre, cinema, and television.

Reviews

“This book, therefore, takes us along a journey through novels, theatre, film and television, using collections of text both large and small, to conduct an exegesis of the spoken word in writing. It reveals much to us of the accepted ways of transmitting the spoken word on the written page which we simply take for granted; it also reveals those turns of genius and creativity that transform the conventional into novel modes of expression.” – Prof. Michael McCarthy, University of Nottingham

“Individually, the contributors to this collection display a high level of expertise in their particular field, and these include the phenomena of bilingualism and diglossia in francophone literature, the analysis of conversation in television drama/sitcom, multilingualism in Hollywood cinema, code-switching in Chicano literature, variations of English in Ireland at the end of the nineteenth century, and code-switching in contemporary Irish literature.” – Dr. Rebecca Pelan, University College Dublin

“The authors’ goal is to study how real language is represented in fiction, the reason why it is represented in a certain way and under some specific light, the effects sought to provoke in the audience, and the limitations encountered when trying to render these, for instance, in a translated version of the original text.” – Prof. Encarnación Hidalgo Tenorio, Universidad de Granada

Table of Contents

Foreword by Prof. Michael McCarthy, University of Nottingham
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Writing and Reading Diglossia: Evidence from the French-speaking World – Rainier Grutman, University of Ottawa
Abstract
Introduction
Understanding diglossia
Writing diglossia
Reading diglossia
Textual evidence
Double-Dutch
Colonial creole
Maghrebi mix
Another form of hybridity
References
Code-Mixing in Biliterate and Multiliterate Irish Literary Texts – Tina Bennett-Kastor, Wichita State University
Abstract
Introduction
Structural categories of mixing and switching
Functional categories of mixing and switching
Multilingualism and multiliteracy in Ireland
Code-switching in theory and practice
Code-switching in spoken Irish
The texts
Conclusion
References
“Preserving every thing Irish”? The Hiberno-English Dialect of Kevin McCafferty, University of Bergen
Abstract
An oral writer?
Carleton’s peasant Hiberno-English
National writer, national dialect?
General English forms
Northern Hiberno-English forms
General Hiberno-English forms
Southern Hiberno-English forms
A levelled (Southern) dialect
Irish, not Scots
References
Representing Voice in Chicano Theater Through the Use of Orthography: An Analysis of Three Plays by Cherríe Moraga – Carla Jonsson, University of Stockholm
Abstract

Introduction
Code-switch – Lukas Bleichenbacher, University of Zurich
Abstract
Introduction
Code-switching: fiction and reality
Data and method
Situational code-switching
Metaphorical or marked code-switching
Indexical code-switching
Edited code-switching
Results and conclusions
References
Imitating the Conversational Mode in Audiovisual Fiction: Performance Phenomena and Non-clausal Units – Roberto Antonio Valdeón Garcia, University of Oviedo
Abstract
Introduction
Performance phenomena
Repeats
Non-clausal units: inserts
Conclusions
References
Index