Religion in Contemporary Europe

Author: Fulton, John
Gee, Peter
Year:1994
Pages:196
ISBN:0-7734-9028-0
978-0-7734-9028-4
Price:159.95
In this book, some of Europe's foremost academic authorities on the social analysis of religion come together to examine its contemporary role in Europe. David Martin opens by tracing the shifting shape of European religion, focusing on the dynamics of the emerging situation in Central and Eastern Europe. Richard Roberts reviews the interaction of theology and politics in shaping European cultural identity, and Patrick Michel and Petya Nitzova present empirical analyses of the situation in Eastern Europe, in studies of the role of Roman Catholicism and Islam. Grace Davie, Régine Azria and Ahmed Andrews look at Western Europe, examining Britain and France, Jews and Europe and Muslim Women. Jean-Paul Williame outlines the attitudes of Protestantism to the European Community, and Liliane Voyé, and Danièle Hervieu-Léger consider the contribution of Catholicism in the development of subsidiarity and the task of reconstructing a Catholic identity. Jon Davies confronts the impact of war and Michael Watson details the political effects of the Green Movement on European Christianity. James Beckford concludes, drawing out the book's key themes.

Reviews

"The authors, true to their sociologicl training, are looking for patterns and frameworks within which to understand the minutiae of Europe's religious life and the changes that are taking place within this. The case studies are illustrations of wider themes. . . . worth underlining one of these themes in particular; that is the unpredictable nature of European religion and its place within wider, global developments. . . . A welcome and practical step along the way is contained in this volume, in that it includes no less than five contributions from some of the leading French-speaking scholars in the field. . . and one further contribution from a Bulgarian. The international nature of this collection can only enhance the debate amongst English-speaking. . . specialists." - Justificatif, Archives de Sciences Sociales des Religions