Rastafari Movement: Ideological, Theological and Philosophical Considerations

Author: Barnett, Michael A.
Year:2013
Pages:175
ISBN:0-7734-4364-9
978-0-7734-4364-8
Price:159.95
A fresh look at the diverse ideology of the Rastafari movement from its historical Pan African origins. The author’s insight and his detailed comparison of the Rastafari to the Nation of Islam highlights the way in which Black Nationalism helped to develop and maintain positive group identity for preservation and advancement of these movements.

Reviews

“This book takes the perspective that both Pan-African and Black Nationalist groups have gained their autonomous group identities by institutionalization, by creating positive identities, and then providing a framework to preserve their identities against White dominate societies.”
-Prof. Abraham Lavender,
Florida International University


Peer Review(s): “Michael A. Barnett provides an updated interpretation of Rastafari from an insider’s perspective. Using the rubric of Pan Africanism and identity formation theory, Barnett demonstrates how the principles and practices of Rastafari provide its members with an Afro-centric identity and culture that liberates them from the alienating and dominating culture and institutions of Western societies. The comparison with the Nation of Islam, a black Nationalist movement, sheds light of distinctive traits of Rastafari as well as the characteristics it shares with other black liberation movements.”
-Prof. Ennis B. Edmonds,
Kenyon College


“A very interesting piece of work that should contribute to the literature in the field. In addition, it would be of interest to scholars of religion, Rastafari studies and other areas of sociology/anthropology.”
-Prof. Ian Boxill,
University of the West Indies,
Mona, Jamaica


Table of Contents

Foreword by Abraham Lavender
Acknowledgements
INTRODUCTION
Differences Between Pan-Africanism and Black Nationalism
The Rastafari Movement as an Institution for Positive Identity Formation
A Discussion on Identity Formation
Self versus Group/Collective Identity
A Consideration of Group/Collective Identification
Positive Black Identity Formation
CHAPTER 1
PAN-AFRICANISM AND RASTAFARI: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
Historical and Biblical Foundations of the Rastafari Movement
Early beginnings of the Rastafari Movement
Key Historical Events for the Rastafari Movement
CHAPTER 2
THE DIFFERENT MANSIONS AND HOUSES OF THE RASTAFARI MOVEMENT
The Twelve Tribes of Israel
The Ethiopia Africa Black International Congress (Boboshanti) Mansion
Black Supremacy
Observance of the Twenty-One Day Separation in the Boboshanti Camp
The Nyahbinghi Order/Mansion
The Ethiopian Zion Coptic Church
The Ethiopian Orthodox Church
Variations of Ideology and Theology Within the Rastafari Movement
Commonalities Between the Various Mansions of Rastafari
CHAPTER 3
GENERAL OVERVIEW OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF THE RASTAFARI MOVEMENT
CHAPTER 4
IMPORTANT CONCEPTS AND SYMBOLS FOR THE TASTAFARI MOVEMENT
The I and I Concept
The Babylon Concept
The Zion Concept
Symbols
The Holy Herb
The Lion of Judah
Other Pictures
The Ethiopian/Ghanaian and Garvey Flag: Red, Gold and Green & Red black and Green
Diet
The Hair/Dreadlocks of Rastafari
The History of Dreadlocks Among Rastafari
CHAPTER 5
THE GLOBALIZATION OF THE RASTAFARI MOVEMENT
The Globalization of the Rastafari movement From a Jamaican Diasporic Perspective
Rastafari in England
Rastafari in Canada
Rastafari in USA
The Globalization of the Rastafari movement Through Reggae Music
Globalization Through Rastafari Missions
Rastafari Missions to Africa and Repatriation
The Impact of International Rastafari gatherings on the Internationalization of the Movement
CHAPTER 6
A COMPARISON BETWEEN THE RASTAFARI MOVEMENT AND OTHER BLACK THEOLOGICAL MOVEMENTS, SUCH AS THE NATION OF ISLAM AND THE BLACK HEBREW ISRAELITES
Comparing Rastafari with Hebrew Israelites
Comparing the Rastafari Movement with the Nation of Islam
Broad Similarities Between the Rastafari Movement and the Nation of Islam
A Focus on the Group Identities That Are Shaped by the Rastafari Movement and the Nation of Islam
Correlation of the Two Group Identities
A Social Movement Perspective on the Rastafari Movement and the Nation of Islam
APPENDIX
Musing on Body Symbolism
Official Greetings of the Twelve Tribes of Israel Rastafari Mansion
Reflections and Recollections of the Fieldwork Conducted Within the Rastafari Community of South Florida
Attendance at a Binghi (Rastafari Religious Service) in the Redlands District
Attendance at a Boboshanti Service (Binghi)
Conclusions Gleaned From the Fieldwork Among the Boboshanti and the Nyahbinghi in South Florida
Key Rastafari Interviews Conducted by the Author
Interviews With Boboshanti Priests From the Miami Headquarters
Interview with Elder Ras Sam Brown
Notes on the Twenty-One Points Document
Interview With Brian Olsen, Spokesperson for the Ethiopian Zion Coptic Church
References
Index