Political Economy of an Authoritarian Modern State and Religious Nationalism in Egypt

Author: Yohannes, Okbazghi
Year:2001
Pages:364
ISBN:0-7734-7462-5
978-0-7734-7462-8
Price:239.95
This study illuminates the social, political, and economic context in which the rise of Islamic Fundamentalism of Egypt is situated.

Reviews

“Yohannes’s’ decision to isolate the Egyptian case for analytical purposes allows him to dig into the historical evolution of the Egyptian State and society and thus explore the social context of Islamic Fundamentalism in a way that distinguishes himself, as he rightly points out, from the vast majority of Western scholars of the phenomenon, who limit their approaches to the immediate present and to its political and religious aspects. . . . The whole book is characterized by a first-rate political analysis, masterfully dissecting the main characteristics of the Nasser, Sadat, and Mubarak regimes. Yet one of its most distinguished contributions to the study of Islam Fundamentalism, and for that matter to international and comparative politics scholarship. . . is its brilliant attempt to examine the historical process of adaptation of Christianity to the realities of capitalism – mainly through the Reformation - in order to contrast it with the interactions between Islam and international economic forces in the last two centuries.” – Javier Alcalde

“Yohannes meticulously reviews the evolution of the Egyptian social system over the last one hundred and fifty years and clearly establishes that the underdevelopment of the country has rendered the social system vulnerable to recurrent crises of legitimation. . . . well researched and exceptionally well substantiated. It makes a significant contribution to our understanding of religious fundamentalism not only in Egypt for elsewhere including non-Islamic countries.” – Yohann Woldemariam

Table of Contents

Table of contents (main headings):
Foreword by Bereket Habte Selassie
1. Introduction
2. The Historical Genesis
3. Nasserism as the Articulation of Modernism vs. Religious Nationalism
4. Sadatism as Rearticulated Response to the Legitimation Crisis and the Resurgence of Religious Nationalism
5. Mubarak’s Garrison State and Religious Nationalism
6. Conclusion: Back to the Future
Bibliography; Index