Penology and Eschatology in Plato’s Myths

Author: Ward, S. P.
Year:2002
Pages:312
ISBN:0-7734-7249-5
978-0-7734-7249-5
Price:219.95
This work is the first to demonstrate the differences and similarities between Plato’s myths and the traditional kind of which he was critical. It also actively demonstrates the extent to which his own myths support or undermine the philosophical ideas of the dialogues in which they are set. It offers new arguments and criticism on point of detail concerning modern interpretations.

Reviews

“. . . . wide scholarship and attention to detail. . . liveliness, originality and intellectual rigour. . . . an excellent work of philosophy and scholarship on an important topic which has not so far received sufficient attention from scholars.” – A. H. Lesser

“. . . a very scholarly piece of work which showed a detailed mastery of the relevant primary and secondary sources.” – R. F. Stalley

Table of Contents

Table of contents:
Foreword; Preface
1. What is a Myth?
2. Commentary on the Gorgias Myth
3. Commentary on the Phaedo Myth
4. Commentary on the Republic Myth
5. Commentary on the Phaedrus Myth
6. Commentary on the Timaeus Myth
7. Commentary on the The Laws
8. Summary and Implications of the Commentaries
9. Penology and Eschatology in the Early Period
10. Justice and Desiring the Good in the Middle Period
11. Significant Developments in the Late Period
12. Summary and Implications of the Philosophical Essays
13. Conclusion; Bibliography; Index