Northwest Montana’s Environmental Debates

Author: Corbin, Carol
Year:2004
Pages:324
ISBN:0-7734-6444-1
978-0-7734-6444-5
Price:219.95
Using a wide range of texts to analyze the cultural and historical ways that nature has been symbolized, Northwest Montana’s Environmental Debates uncovers deep-rooted assumptions about human relationships with nature. At the center of these debates is the issue of logging. Citizens of northwest Montana have been split over their beliefs and values particularly in arguments over logging old growth forests. Corbin suggests that there is no “truth” about how humans should live with nature; rather there are competing social constructions of the human/nature dialectic that underpin the clashes over logging.

Reviews

“As an astute mediator, Corbin gives us a thorough and insightful account of the debates over logging and wolves and bears and bison and wilderness in Montana. …...Corbin’s compassionate account of the many voices struggling over the site of Montana contains wise lessons for all of us as we struggle to construct a habitable world” – Kevin DeLuca, University of Georgia

“Carol Corbin's book, Northwestern Montana's Environmental Debates delivers far more than its modest title promises. Scholars of language and communication relating to the environment have been waiting for just such a book since the inception of the field in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Corbin's book establishes, once and for all, the credibility if not the centrality of studies in environmental communication to the discipline at large.” - Christine L. Oravec, University of Utah

"[The author] often takes a dialectic approach to issues allowing various viewpoints to contribute to a greater understanding of the issues and generating an informed reader. ... This is a book not about 'us against them', instead it is about 'us' and the diversity of of people, cultural constructs, and attitudes that comprise the human spirit." -- Dr. Jon Burley, Michigan State University

Table of Contents

Table of Contents:
Preface
1. Introduction
2. Symbolizing Nature
3. Carving Up Space
4. Varieties of Temporal Experiences
5. Nature as Commodity
6. Nature as Scene of Survival and Freedom
7. New Environmental Discourses
Conclusion
References; Index