Modern Technology in the Heideggerian Perspective, Vol. 2

Author: Lovitt, William
Lovitt, Harriet
Year:1995
Pages:600
ISBN:0-88946-269-0
978-0-88946-269-4
Price:319.95
A groundbreaking study, containing a landmark inquiry into structural coherences pervading Heidegger's thinking.

Reviews

"Although shedding a great deal of light on Heidegger's understanding of modern technology, this remarkable two-volume work does much more than this. It also provides an unparalleled systematic analysis of all the major themes in Heidegger's thought. The intelligence, care, and time that the authors have devoted to their task are indicative of their respect for the achievements of this great, though controversial German thinker. All the more noteworthy, then, is the fact that the authors conclude with a lengthy and unsparing - though fair-minded - criticism of Heidegger's thought from a number of different perpectives." - Michael Zimmerman

"The elegance, the eloquence, the precision, the incisiveness just leap off the pages at one." - Durwood Foster ". . . a careful study that everyone seriously interested in Heidegger will want to have by his side, return to over and over again, truly a companion to Heidegger. This is hardly an issue in Heidegger that is not presented and discussed here at some length and in a careful and illuminating way. This is then a work one can recommend to the serious student and scholar. In this connection I find the long idex enormously helpful." - Karsten Harries

". . . they see the elaboration of the Being-question effectively instantiated in the question about technology. The result is that by tracing the evolution of this single theme they manage to give the reader a compelling sense of Heidegger's project as a whole. . . . In every way possible they let the philosopher speak for himself, often choosing to clarify obscure passages through complementary texts of his own rather than by an intrusive interpretation of theirs. . . . The language is carefully sculpted to convey the nuances of the original German, and often the authors' own translations of familiar terms give the text freshness that is invigorating even when it is not provocative. Amply indexed and supplemented by four different glossaries, these two rich volumes provide a valuable resource for specialist, yet remain fundamentally accessible to the general reader in search of a trustworthy, well-balanced overview of Heidegger's entire enterprise. All in all, a splendid achievement!" - William J. Richardson, author of Heidegger: Through Phenomenology to Thought