Metrological Study of the Early Roman Basilicas

Author: Walthew, Christopher
Year:2002
Pages:364
ISBN:0-7734-7230-4
978-0-7734-7230-3
Price:249.95
This book presents the first systematic and detailed discussion of the planning of Roman basilicas during the late Republic and early Empire, from the second century BC to second century AD. Basilicas were buildings of major economic, political and religious significance in Roman civic life. The clarity and coherence of their designs makes them ideal subjects for metrological analysis – scrutiny of the dimensions with which they were laid out. The core of the book, based on extensive fieldwork in Italy and the most recent archaeological research, is a meticulous examination of 35 basilicas drawn from Italy and the western Roman provinces, supported by numerous plans, tables, and a wide-ranging bibliography. The conclusion highlights for the first time the carefully formulated set of principles and proportions with which Roman architects designed buildings of this type. This study is a major new contribution to the history of Roman architecture and planning. With many illustrations.

Reviews

“This meticulous study of the metrology of the Roman basilica in Italy and the western provinces is the first systematic analysis of its kind. It reveals distinct patterning in the way buildings were planned and executed such that we can envisage architects across the empire working to the same rules and metrical relationships. Research of this kind is crucial to our understanding both of the dissemination of ideas in the Roman world and of the regions and provinces in which particular architectural traditions prevailed.” – Giustificativo, Pubblicato sul Bollettino del cirt

“This is an impressive and meticulous piece of research. . . . By its very nature the subject is dense and complicated, but Dr. Walthew has presented the material in a standard format to allow easy comparison; the illustrations (essential in a work of this kind) are clear and well-produced. . . . this publication will provide a basis for future research as well as signalling the importance of such research in Roman studies generally.” – Dr. Hazel Dodge

“This meticulous study of the metrology of the Roman basilica in Italy and the western provinces is the first systematic analysis of its kind. It reveals distinct patterning in the way buildings were planned and executed such that we can envisage architects across the empire working to the same rules and metrical relationship. Research of this kind is crucial to our understanding both of the dissemination of ideas in the Roman world and of the regions and provinces in which particular architectural traditions prevailed.” – M. G. Mulford