James Joyce and Modernismbeyond Dublin

Author: Levitt, Morton
Year:2000
Pages:296
ISBN:0-7734-7869-8
978-0-7734-7869-5
Price:199.95
In these essays, which cover a period of more than thirty years, a noted Joyce critic traces some of the major developments in the criticism of the 20th century’s most influential writer, revealing the critical tradition through which Joyce came to be considered a cultural icon.

Reviews

“Levitt has been a distinguished critic of James Joyce and modernism for more than three decades. This volume collects 13 essays that he has published or presented in various places over the years and affords him the privilege of commenting on his own work in retrospect. . . .The broad nature of Levitt’s interests allows him to consider poetry, painting, music, and the rebirth of experimentalism in the South American novel, all in a modernist context. . . . these essays hold up well. They are informative, and often provocative, and the book stands as a solid demonstration of a scholarly career that has made significant contribution to Joyce studies and the field of literature.” - CHOICE

“Levitt deserves credit for his achievement. Taken together, the riches embodied in the essays themselves, and their settings – his enlightening testimony about the historical place of each in his own study of Joyce and Joyce studies generally – constitute a valuable book.” – James Joyce Literary Supplement

“. . . this volume presents a marvelous chronicle of the maturation of a fine critical mind. It also collects a series of important readings on Joyce. Generalists, specialists, and ordinary lovers of literature will all benefit from this work.” – Michael Patrick Gillespie

Table of Contents

Table of contents:
Preface by Morris Beja
Introduction: James Joyce in Context
The Family of Bloom
A Hero for Our Time: Leopold Bloom and the Myth of Ulysses
Joyce, Kazantzakis and Modernist Mythopoesis
Shalt be Accurst? The Martyr in James Joyce
The Humanity of Bloom, the Jewishness of Joyce
Ulyssean Readings: Some Warnings for the Critic
Joyce and Fuentes: Not Influence but Aura
Harry Levin, James Joyce and the Modernist Age
The Radical Consistency of Point of View in Ulysses: A Traditional Reading
The New Midrash: Finnegans Wake
Joyce and Vuillard: The Music of Painting
Cezanne Is to Diebenkorn as Joyce Is to Joyce: Realizing the Modernist Imagination
Beyond Dublin: Joyce and Modernism
Works cited, Index