Isaac Newton's Philosophy of Sacred Space and Sacred Time

Author: Gregory Gillette
Year:2007
Pages:136
ISBN:0-7734-5406-3
978-0-7734-5406-4
Price:139.95
This book provides an analysis of the concepts of space and time in the thought and writings of Sir Isaac Newton, attempting to illustrate his portrayal of both of these as sacred, not merely material entities. This book offers an interesting contribution to current debates concerning the relationship between science and religion, and will appeal to those who study the philosophy of religion, theology, and the history of science.

Reviews

“The history of science is often told as a transition from foolish, dogmatic credulity before the scientific revolution to hardheaded skepticism afterward. Dr. Gillette’s work helps us to see that in a very important sense the story is the reverse. Many modern scientists do look upon their findings with a healthy and modest skepticism, but far too many have extrapolated from their empirical observations to dogmatic metaphysical claims clinging to them with fervent faith. The present book places before them one of the greatest scientists of all time, whose thinking in this regard they would do well to emulate.” – Dr. Ben Lockerd, Professor of English, Grand Valley State University

“Dr. Gillette argues forcefully that Isaac Newton, arguably the greatest physicist to have ever lived – and unarguably a deeply committed Christian – is an exemplar of how a scientist can do deeply theoretical work in a way that does not deny the active presence of God in the physical universe ... Philosophers of religion, theologians, and historians of science will find this book immensely useful.” – Dr. Gary Jason, Adjunct Professor of Philosophy, California State University, Fullerton

“With analytical depth, Dr. Gillette provides erudite insights into particular aspects of Newton’s work regarding cosmology and metaphysics. This book will certainly generate more academic curiosity regarding Newton’s corpus for scholars and teachers of both the sciences and the humanities.” – Dr. Eric Grabowsky, Assistant Professor, Communications Department, University of Mary

Table of Contents

Preface by Ben Lockerd
Acknowledgements
Introduction
1 Isaac Newton and the Theology of Space and Time
2 Paul Elmer More and Platonic Skepticism
3 Ceremonial Considerations of Sacred Space and Sacred Time
Bibliography
Index