Is Isaiah's "Servant Covenant" the New Covenant? An Exegetical Study

Author: Fredrickson, David K.
Year:2014
Pages:276
ISBN:0-7734-0079-6
978-0-7734-0079-5
Price:199.95
“Fredrickson’s work is fresh, engaging and foundational for those who embrace the blessings of the New Covenant. His careful exegesis of the relevant new Covenant texts makes his book an especially helpful resource… this book would be warmly welcomed by biblical scholars, theologians and serious minded pastors. [It] is a significant contribution to the study of the New Covenant and the question of whether the New Covenant is referred to in Isaiah’s Servant Songs.
– Professor J. Carl Laney,
Western Seminary, Oregon

Reviews

“Fredrickson has shown sharp analytical ability and exegetical mastery that go beyond what theologians normally display…Out of this discussion comes what is perhaps the most important contribution of [his] overall work: establishing how we know if an OT text other than Jeremiah 31:31 is a new covenant text…This new model is actually the implementation of the hermeneutical spiral of Osborne or the verificational method of Lewis and Demarest among other classifications.”
-Dr. Mike Stallard,
Dean, Baptist Bible Seminary,
Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania


“It is most exciting that God promises a New Covenant for His people. The inauguration of that promise is a central theme for Jesus and the new Testament writers. Dave Fredrickson has taken on the task of developing a sound exegetical approach to identifying exactly which Old Testament passages are actually new Covenant passages. Beyond that interpretive task, Fredrickson shows the reader that the New Covenant is thoroughly Trinitarian and messianic as well pheumatological. It will always be Israel centered, while fulfilling the Abrahamic promise of blessing to all nations. Fredrickson is a careful scholar who has done the Church a great favor in clarifying this central issue.”
- Gerry Breshears,
Professor of Theology
Western Seminary, Oregon,


“Dr. Fredrickson has made a significant contribution to the study of the New Covenant and the question of whether the New Covenant is referred to in Isaiah’s Servant Songs. His proposed model for determining what constitutes a New Covenant Text is not only useful on considering Isaiah’s texts, but also other OT Texts which appear to include New Covenant characteristics. Fredrickson’s work is fresh, engaging and foundational for those who embrace the blessings of the New Covenant. His careful exegesis of the relevant new Covenant texts makes his book an especially helpful resource. I believe this book would be warmly welcomed by biblical scholars, theologians and serious minded pastors.”
-J. Carl Laney,
Professor of Biblical Literature,
Western Seminary, Oregon


Table of Contents

Abstract
Foreword by Michael Stallard
CHAPTER I:
THE NEED FOR A STUDY ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISAIAH’S “SERVANT COVENANT” AND THE NEW COVENANT

A. The Current Gap in Evangelical Scholarship Regarding Isaiah’s Servant-covenant and the New Covenant
B. Isaiah’s Servant-covenant and Apparent Disparities between the Testaments Regarding the New Covenant
C. The Impact of Isaiah’s Servant-covenant upon “Replacement Theologies”
D. The Strategy of This Study

CHAPTER II:
EXEGESIS OF THE TWO SERVANT SONGS INCORPORATING THE SERVANT-COVENANT, ISAIAH 42:1-7 AND ISAIAH 49: 1-13

A. The Theological Use of the Term (“Servant”) in Isaiah
B. The First Servant Song (Isaiah 42: 1-7)

1. Introductory Issues for the First Servant Song
2. Exegesis of Isaiah 42:1-7
3. Summary of the First Servant Song
C. The Second Servant Song (Isaiah 49: 1-13)
1. Introductory Issues for the Second Servant Song
2. Exegesis of Isaiah 40: 1-13
3. Summary of the Second Servant Song
D. Integration of the First Two Servant Songs with Other Key Texts
1. The Servant-covenant with Isaiah 55:3 and 61:8
2. The Servant-covenant with Isaiah 54:9-10
3. The Servant-covenant with Isaiah 59: 15-21
4. The Servant-covenant with Jeremiah 31:27-40
5. Isaiah 42:1-4 with Matthew 12:18-21
6. Isaiah 49:8 with 2 Corinthians 6:2
7. Isaiah 49:6 with Acts 13:47 and Acts 1:8
8. Isaiah 49:3-12 with Luke 2:29-35
9. The Servant-covenant with Luke 22:20 and 1 Corinthians 11:25
10. Conclusion from the Integration of the Servant-Covenant Passages with other Key passages
CHAPTER III:
OVERVIEW OF PRIOR MODELS FOR QUALIFYING AN OLD TESTAMENT PASSSAGE AS A NEW COVENANT PASSAGE

A. Brief Models for Establishing Old Testament Passages as New Covenant Passages
1. The “Formative Model” of Walter C. Kaiser
2. The “Generic Eschatological Model” of R. Bruce Compton
3. The “Minimalist Model” of John R. Master
4. The “Modified Kaiser Model” of Larry D. Pettegrew
B. Extended Models for Establishing Old Testament Passages as New Covenant Passages
1. The Model of Pierre Buis
2. The Model of Paul R. Thorsell
C. Summary Evaluation of the Models
CHAPTER IV:
DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW MODEL FOR SURFACING NEW COVENANT PASSAGES IN THE OLD TESTAMENT

A. Description and Defense of the Proposed Model
B. A Strategic Element of the Proposed Model
C. Summary of the Proposed Model
CHAPTER V:
SELECTED OUTCOMES FROM THE MODEL: IS ISAIAH’S “SERVANT-COVENANT” THE NEW COVENANT?

A. Are the “Servant-covenant Passages” of Isaiah to be Considered New Covenant Passages?
B. Is the “Servant-covenant” of Isaiah to be Considered the New Covenant?
C. Conclusions

CHAPTER VI: RAMIFICATIONS OF THE “SERVANT-COVENANT” AND THE PROPOSED NEW COVENANT MODEL, FOR FUTURE STUDY
A. More Ramifications of the “Servant-covenant” for the New Covenant
B. Areas for Further Study

WORKS CITED
INDEX