Interpretation of the Poetry of Propertius (c. 50 - 15 B. C.)

Author: Arkins, Brian T.
Year:2005
Pages:116
ISBN:0-7734-6229-5
978-0-7734-6229-8
Price:119.95

Reviews

“The time is ripe for the appearance of a book on this extremely important poet. What seems to me particularly to be needed is what Professor Arkins admirably provides, namely a study which takes into account recent critical work on Propertius in Classical studies and also engages his art, thought and sensibility with literary and social themes of our own time. It is of the utmost importance that such a study should be written in a style which attracts not only those whose main scholarly interest is in the literature of the first Principate, but also readers with a general interest in poetry and literature. These requirements Brian Arkins most effectively fulfils.”
– Professor David Rankin,
University of Southampton, England


“Professor Brian Arkins has established a solid reputation in Ireland and abroad. He is an unusual scholar by virtue of his acknowledged expertise in both Classics and Anglo-Irish literature. This double expertise has enabled him to write with authority not only on mainstream Classical topics but also on the Classical influences which gave important direction to the work of writers such as Yeats and Joyce. In this new book there are four sections, meshing well with each other and designed to make possible an informed as well as pleasurable reading of Propertius.”
– Professor Colm Luibhéid,
National University of Ireland, Galway


“Propertius is one of the most exciting of the Latin poets. But the richness and complexity of his poems has often daunted reader and interpreter alike. Brian Arkins' book eschews all such forebodings and in going to the heart of the poems to ask what and how Propertius is communicating with his audience, rediscovers for us the immediacy of the poet's experience...Brian Arkins clearly writes from the perspective of someone deeply versed in all aspects of literary enterprise, ancient and modern."
– Professor Andrew Smith,
University College of Dublin, Ireland


Table of Contents

Preface
1. Backgrounds, Political, Social, Literary
2. The Callimachean Aesthetic of Propertius
3. The Primacy of Cynthia
4. Coming to Terms with Augustus
Notes
Select Bibliography Index