Influence and Anxiety of the British Romantics Spectres of Romanticism

Author: Ruston, Sharon
Year:1999
Pages:276
ISBN:0-7734-7999-6
978-0-7734-7999-9
Price:199.95
This collection of essays examines the preoccupation of Romantic writers and Romantic critics with the presence of ghosts in the text. Contributors refer to theories of intertextuality influence and allusion, authorial presence and absence, and anatomy literature. They confront the ‘spectres' of both artistic and critical precursors in new readings of Romantic texts. The volume also widens the field of critical work on the Romantics' haunting of later writers, demonstrating that romantic influence has reached across geographical and historical boundaries, examining the work of Henry James, William Rossetti, and the Dutch poet Willem Kloos. Contains illustrations by William Blake.

Table of Contents

Table of contents:

Preface (John Whale)

Introduction (Sharon Ruston)

1.Terror, Transcendence and Control in Charlotte Dacre's Zofloya, or The Moor (Sue Chaplin)

2.William Blake and the Spectre of Anatomy (Tristanne Connolly)

3.‘The moving accident is not my trade': Wordsworth, Lyrical Ballads, and the Anxiety of German Borrowings (Peter Mortensen)

4.‘A new species of humorous writing': Thomas Love Peacock and the Renegotiation of Genre (Jerome de Groot)

5.Shelley's ‘The Triumph of Life': A Resistance to History and the Art of Forgetting (Rieko Suzuki)

6.‘You'll pardon me for being jocular': La Belle Dame Sans Merci and Keats's Light Verse (James Kidd)

7.Resurrecting Thomas Lovell Beddoes (Michael Bradshaw)

8.Ghastly Visualities: Keats and Victorian Art (Sarah Wootton)

9.Sinister romance: A Twist of the Tale in The Turn of the Screw (Hazel Hutchison)

10.Mediumistic Shelley Sonnets in the Netherlands (Kris Steyaert)

Bibliography, Index