How Brazilian Films Developed Multiple National Identities, 1930-2000

Author: McDonald, Sarah
Year:2011
Pages:216
ISBN:0-7734-3946-3
978-0-7734-3946-7
Price:179.95
This text is the first to move beyond the traditional implementation of anthropophagy by using the theoretical construct of cannibalism to examine the role of popular cinema in shaping the nation’s identity and the changing pressures on national cinema in the current global environment of cultural production.

Reviews

“[The text] constitutes with authority an exploration of the varied developments and phases that this art has adopted towards the consolidation and perfecting of anthropophagic decolonising tactics.” – Prof. Walescka Pino-Ojeda, University of Auckland

“…compulsory reading not only for students of Brazilian cinema but for those in Film Studies more broadly.” – Prof. Alfredo Martinez-Exposito, University of Queensland

“…offers a wide range of cultural, cinematic and socio-political insights into the complex formations of colonial and post-colonial Brazilian identities.” – Prof. Bernadette Luciano, University of Auckland

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Foreword by Walescka Pino-Ojeda

Acknowledgements

Introduction

I South of the Border: Locating a Cinematic Brazil

II Girls and Samba: The Production of a Gendered Tropicality

III Metamorphosis of the ‘Mulatta’: Reconfiguring Femininity

IV Favela Nation: Globalisation and the Consumption of Violence

Conclusion

Filmography

Bibliography

Index