Fast Day Sermons Before the Long Parliament (1640-1660): Their Role in Shaping Intellectual and Political Life in 17th-Century England

Author: Dippel, Stewart
Year:2015
Pages:320
ISBN:0-7734-4249-9
978-0-7734-4249-8
Price:219.95
This is a remarkable study of rather ordinary people whose religious convictions led them to preach and to do extraordinary things. This work examines the relationships between religion, particularly constructed as the function of leadership framed by religious identities or motivations, and transformations, attempted or effected, of the political order.

Reviews

“In this volume, Professor Dippel demonstrates that historians can see men and women not as others see them but as they saw themselves and that, in this way, we can still learn lessons that are of value in the fight. For that, those of us in other battalions who look to history for a measure of support may well be grateful.”
-Professor David Strain,
English and Humanities,
University of the Ozarks


Table of Contents

Preface
Foreword by David Strain
Acknowledgments 1. Religion and Revolution: The first fast day sermons, “This train carries saints and sinners”
2. Religion and Revolution: The theoretical and historiographical framework
A Theory and Model of Charisma and Prophecy
The Historiography of Religion and Revolution
3. Parliamentary Fast Day Sermons: The Prophetic Call
Introduction: Hugh Peter as God’s Prophet to Parliament
The initial crisis: 1641
The crisis deepens in the face of military and attendant political challenges: 1644-45
The crisis widens to the issue of an ungodly king and the ungodly among the presumptively godly: 1647-48
4. Parliamentary fast Day Sermons: The nationalist and ethical traditions and contexts
The initial crisis: 1641-43
The crisis deepens: 1644-45
The crisis widens: 1646-48
5. The Prophetic Message “From the Street”
The initial crisis: 1641-42
The crisis deepens: 1644-46
The crisis widens: 1647-48
6. Prophecy and the Good Old Cause
Afterward: England’s Prophets and the Dispensations of Providence
Bibliography
Index