Essays on Heidegger and European Philosophy. Meridian of Thinking

Author: Vaughan, William
Year:2003
Pages:284
ISBN:0-7734-7022-0
978-0-7734-7022-4
Price:199.95
Vaughan carefully explains the essential Heidegger concepts regarding historicity, language, truth, freedom, world, and art. Devotees of Heidegger may at last discover a measure of clarity in Vaughan’s exposition of Heidegger's corpus.

Reviews

“William Vaughan has given us a superb book. Each essay in this rich array of articles treats a subject that must meet with lively interest from every reader who knows Heidegger. . . . Vaughan never pontificates but nimbly ventures stances clearly intended to spur dialogue. Throughout the book he moves about within the Heidegger corpus with ease and accuracy and makes an extremely valuable contribution toward rescuing Heidegger’s later works from the obscurity that excessive preoccupation with Being and Time has tended to further in America.” – William Lovitt

“. . . each ‘stroll’ is introduced by an evocative contemporary question which hooks the reader. What elements of the Pauline view of time did the supposed atheist Heidegger bring from his study of the epistles to his great work, Being and Time? Why did Heidegger remain so silent about the Holocaust and his dalliance with National Socialism?. . . . Vaughan takes plenty of time to carefully explain essential Heidegger concepts regarding historicity, language, truth, freedom, world, and art. Readers who have struggled to understand Heidegger’s take on these concepts, despite laboring through plenty of other secondary works on Heidegger, may at last discover a measure of clarity in Vaughan’s exposition.” – Douglas Chismar

Table of Contents

Table of contents:
Preface
1. Phenomenology of Time in Pauline Epistles
2. Philosophy of History and the Deaths that Precede Ours
3. Nür Geistiges ist Schrecklich: Freedom and Spiritual Evil in Schelling
4. Favor: On the Kantian Sublime
5. The Late Athens Address on Art
6. De Mans Heidegger
7. Heidegger Silentio
8. Encounter with Scheler
9. Destructive Retrieval of John
10. The Phenomenon of Placelessness
11. Ryle and Phenomenology
12. Already Bored with the Hyperreal
13. Notes