Dorothy L. Sayers' Wimsey and Interwar British Society

Author: Lewis, Terrance
Year:1995
Pages:200
ISBN:0-7734-9102-3
978-0-7734-9102-1
Price:159.95
Looks at interwar British society as Sayers portrayed it in the eleven novels and twenty-one short stories concerning her famous creation, detective Lord Peter Wimsey. These works accurately represent the period and society the author was living in and really understood and as such are primary evidence of the period. It examines details of interest to both the historian and the culturalist of the period, as well as being of interest to a general audience. The work includes a short biography of Dorothy L. Sayers.

Reviews

". . . Lewis writes clearly and makes a substantial contribution to the social history of the period as reflected in one form of popular culture. . . . General and academic collections." - Choice

"This volume includes chapters on: the effects of The Great War; the ruling, middle, and working classes; women's status; attitudes to foreigners; politics and advertising. It has stimulating things to say on several of these, especially on the middle classes, the only social groups of which Sayers had significant direct experience, and women - thankfully Mr Lewis does not represent Sayers as a feminist before her time." - Philip L. Scowcroft, The Dorothy L. Sayers Society Bulletin No. 124

". . . intriguing study. . . . the author examines Sayers's works in order to reconstruct Sayers's society as she saw it, and thereby provide historians of the period with further detail by which to evaluate British society between the wars." - Seven: An Anglo-American Literary Review

"As a fan of Sayers' books, I found it a fascinating compendium of information on her works; as an amateur historian of the period between the World Wars, I found it an extraordinarily creative and insightful view of several aspects of British society. Be