Comparative Study of Infant Mortality in Four Developing Countries

Author: Kidanemariam, Andemariam
Year:2003
Pages:164
ISBN:0-7734-6746-7
978-0-7734-6746-0
Price:179.95
The emphasis in this study is placed on viewing health issues as an important and integral part of the social, economic, and political structure of society, and not only as a scientific, technocratic concern as is often the case with biomedical model. This book used the historical/contextual method, capturing the socio-political determinants of infant mortality that are not often amenable to quantification. It underscores the importance of state-society relations and development policy choices that directly impinge on distributional equality/inequality of the medical and non-medical determinants of infant mortality.

Reviews

“…Kidanemariam writes as a seasoned multidisciplinarian…. This knowledge leads to a sharpened awareness that fuels ethical and political debate over glaring differences in the comparative health status of developing and developed societies….he frames cogent research questions that, though vital for public policy and scientific understanding, have not yet been approached in a systematic analysis. Kidanemariam generates a research methodology adequate to address these questions and emerges with a quartet of ‘national cases’ – Brazil, South Korea, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh (State and Society; Development Policies; Distribution of Development Benefit – landholding, income, educational system, health care system)– that, examined through his comparative research lens, respond effectively to his questions…. This book will have defining significance for some time to come in the new field of the political economy of health. It will serve as a springboard for future research and as a framework for policy debate concerning the role of the developing nations and their populations in the evolving global order.” – Eugene B. Gallagher

Table of Contents

Table of contents:
Preface; Foreword
1. Introduction
2. Demographic, Economic and Medical Determinants of Infant Mortality
3. Three Theoretical Frameworks
4. Brazil, Bangladesh, South Korea, and Sri Lanka in Comparative Perspective
5. Brazil (State and Society; Development Policies; Distribution of Development Benefit – landholding, income, educational system, health care system)
6. Bangladesh (State and Society; Development Policies; Distribution of Development Benefit – landholding, income, educational system, health care system)
7. Sri Lanka (State and Society; Development Policies; Distribution of Development Benefit – landholding, income, educational system, health care system)
8. South Korea (State and Society; Development Policies; Distribution of Development Benefit – landholding, income, educational system, health care system)
9. Putting the Pieces Together
10. Conclusion
Bibliography; Index