Communion with the Church and the Code of Canon Law an Analysis of the Foundation and Implications of the Canonical Obligation to Maintain Communion with the Catholic Church

Author: Kaslyn, Robert
Year:1994
Pages:316
ISBN:0-7734-9423-5
978-0-7734-9423-7
Price:249.95
Through an analysis of the conciliar sources of the obligation of the Christian faithful to maintain communion with the Church, the revision of the previous law, and the process of articulating the obligation, this text uncovers the theological complexity and richness of a communion ecclesiology. From this basis, the text examines specific issues, including the function of the papacy, the common priesthood of the faithful, collegiality, dissent, the sacrament of marriage and the role of faith, and the question of Anglican orders.

Reviews

"Dulles commends the book as a 'thorough, luminous, and judicious study of the concept of communion.' This reviewer recommends it to bishops, ecclesiologists, theologians, ecumenists and canonists - everyone concerned with church process and structures." - Theological Studies

"The book is a signally important contribution to the area of communio ecclesiology and its applications to canonical issues. . . . provides a stimulating overview of communio ecclesiology, the varied theories and opinions of its leading proponents, and some of its canonical ramifications. It is carefully organized, clearly written, and ecumenically engaged." - Studia Canonica

". . . an excellent example of a new theological-ecclesiological approach to the understanding of the canon law of the Catholic Church. While scholarly and exhaustively documented, it has significant breadth and is written facilely and intelligibly. . . . recommend strongly Communion with the Church and the Code of Canon Law not only to canonists and ecclesiologists but to others concerned with the nature of the Church of Christ and the ways in which that nature is being better articulated at the present time. It is an accomplished work, evidence of thorough scholarship presented in highly readable fashion." - Frederick R. McManus

"He raises significant questions relating to faith, to the sacraments, and to church governance since all of these areas flow from the notion of communio as used in the Code. . . . The insights given to these debated questions, if they are read in a commu