Christian Doctrine in the Light of Michael Polanyi's Theory of Personal KnowledgeA Personalist Theology

Author: Crewdson, Joan
Year:1994
Pages:445
ISBN:0-7734-9150-3
978-0-7734-9150-2
Price:299.95
This book shows how Polanyi's theory of personal knowledge provides a framework of interpretation capable of making a theistic view of reality credible. It explores the thesis that we live in an open and personal universe, with persons as the highest product of the evolutionary process. The nature of the personal must ultimately be understood in the light of what God is. Such an understanding allows us to see God and creation as a single order of personal reality, in which God is both transcendent and immanent. This thesis is explored with particular reference to the doctrines of creation, the trinity, the incarnation and the kingdom of God.

"Beginning from Polyani, Miss Crewdson has gone on to construct a wide-ranging philosophy of religion and to draw from it some implications for problems of Christian theology. . . . It is impossible in a short review to do justice to the rich intellectual and spiritual texture of Miss Crewdson's work." - The Expository Times

Reviews

"Joan Crewdson has provided the most extensive application of Polanyi's insights to Christian theology since John Apczynski's Doers of the Word. . . . Crewdson has immersed herself in the Polanyi corpus and accurately understood his intent with felicity. Her elucidation of his thought is executed in crisp prose. . . . This is a must-read for contemporary theologians." - The Journal of Religion ". . . . a competent, well-written analysis which enjoys the advantage of being extremely clearly reasoned in remarkably attractive prose. The usual scholarly apparatus of thorough footnotes, a useful index and a bibliography are features of Crewdson's study. . . . This is an excellent book, a genuine labour of love and a delight to read and reflect upon." - Network

"Her analysis is powerful, her own faith very clear, and the centrality of Polanyi's thinking for her interpretation of Christianity inescapable. Any reader concerned to explore the intricacies of the trinitarian faith will find much here to become engrossed in, and there are places where the depth of scholarship will reward careful and repeated study. . . . As spiritual homily it is little short of profound: few prepared to explore these many pages will fail to be moved. . . " - Tradition and Discovery, The Polanyi Society Periodical "Many theologians have used or quoted aspects of the work of Michael Polanyi as a philosopher of science: but I don't know of anyone who has achieved what Joan Crewdson has, both in presenting a full and clear analysis of Polanyi's thinking and in relating it to such a wide range of areas in Christian thinking. It is a highly significant study, deserving widespread attention. This is a book for which many will be grateful." -- Rowan Williams, Bishop of Monmouth

"What sort of sense is to be made out of our human capacity to know the universe, other persons and ourselves? Are we temporary self-conscious accidents or emergent relational mysteries whose relationship extends to the possibilities of God? This book, which has taken many years of research, reflection, composition and writing, dares to tackle this issue systematically with an old-fashioned attempt at comprehending comprehensiveness. . . . a systematic witness to faith, reason and hope. It is also a challenge to all trivialising and diminishment of our world, our knowing and our personal longing. It is therefore a resource for arguments, insights and investigations into our personal quest as individuals in relationships, for our building up of a society which begins to measure up to personal possibilities and for taking up fresh and enlarging approaches to our various disciplines, both humane and scientific." -- David Jenkins, Bishop of Durham

"What is therefore commendable about this publication is not only the larger project it represents to restate and relocate a personalist metaphysic as a viable option in the context of modern 'post-critical' philosophy...but also the more focused intentio