Christ as Criminal Antinomian Trends for a New Millennium

Author: Hanks, Donald
Year:1997
Pages:240
ISBN:0-7734-8513-9
978-0-7734-8513-6
Price:199.95
This volume begins with an examination of the manner in which the antinomian lifestyle of the historical Jesus, culminating in his trial and conviction, is described in the synoptic gospels. It then considers the Judaic theocratic tradition which he inherited, and his opposition to religious legalism. Further chapters examine the covenants; origins of the early church; Protestant theology in the 19th century (particularly Kant and Schleiermacher); the Jesus of History; the new dialogue of the antinomian Jesus with Buddhism and radical theology; and the Kingdom as Enlightenment.

Reviews

"Dr. Hanks' book is an exciting and bold piece of scholarship integrating threads in Eastern and Western thought. His book promises to stir continued debate over the historical characterization of Jesus, the import of his mission, and his self-conception. The trials and execution of Jesus are explored from several provocative angles. . . . Dr. Hanks' manuscript is wide-ranging, well-documented, eclectic, provocative, immensely readable and challenging. It will no doubt stimulate vigorous discussion of a number of important ideas to philosophers, teachers of religion, and persons of faith." - Dr. Deborah A. Rosen

". . . stakes out a clear position concerning the new quest of the historical Jesus and makes use of recent postmodern scholarship to contribute to this ongoing debate. It also contributes to the Christianity-Buddhism discussion drawing again, in part, on postmodern scholarship . . . . timely, well-written and makes a significant and thought-provoking contribution in its thesis concerning the criminality of Jesus as the Christ." - C. Ellsworth Hood.