Chaucer’s the Knight’s Tale and the Limits of Human Order in the Pagan World

Author: Curtis, III, Carl C.
Year:2008
Pages:284
ISBN:0-7734-5059-9
978-0-7734-5059-2
Price:199.95
Reveals Chaucer’s understanding of the ancient world and how the he dealt with the complex moral philosophy between Christian and pagan doctrines.

Reviews

“. . . a breakthrough in Chaucerian scholarship . . . can only open doors to fuller understanding of Chaucer’s other works, of his particular art, and of, perhaps, his contemporary audience and fellow poets struggling to establish their authority against inherited tradition and the Church.” – Prof. Gwendolyn A. Morgan, Montana State University

". . . a seminal work of impressively articulate scholarship that begins with a Medieval critique of paganism in general and of modern critics to Chaucer's 'The Knight's Tale' in particular, then proceeds to explore the themes of the Heroic Ideal and the Heroic Life; The allegories of Rule and Love; the constitution of ancient Athens with respect to mercy, fortune, theater as a vehicle for life lessons; and concludes with the ultimate failure and eventual re-founding of Athens. Enhanced with copious footnotes, an eight-page bibliography, and a comprehensive index, Chaucer's The Knight's Tale And The Limits of Human Order In The Pagan World is a particularly recommended addition to academic library Chaucerian Studies and Literary Studies reference collections and graduate school level supplemental reading lists." - Midwest Book Review

“Curtis succeeds in his perception of the tale as a dialectical query in which life is a journey, a pilgrimage. . . . For Chaucer, the classical world, without God, resembles a place without direction or clear purpose.” – Prof. Eva Núñez Mendez, Portland State University

“. . . adds immeasurably to the corpus of Chaucer scholarship . . . Ultimately, Curtis suggests that Chaucer saw the inadequacy of the pagan world, highlighting the superiority of biblical revelation and ultimate issues of individual salvation and human destiny.” – Prof. Bruce K. Bell, Liberty University

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction
1. The Heroic Ideal and the Heroic Life: Prima Pars
2. The Two Allegories: Prima Pars and Pars Secunda
3. The Constitution of Athens: Pars Tercia
4. The Failure and Refounding of Athens: Pars Quarta
Bibliography
Index