Bureau of Motion Pictures and Its Influence on Film Content During World War II. The Reasons for Its Failure

Author: Myers, James
Year:1998
Pages:244
ISBN:0-7734-8304-7
978-0-7734-8304-0
Price:199.95
This book examines the United States government’s efforts to use the motion picture industry to aid the war effort and maintain high public morale during the Second World War.

Reviews

“As he has sorted through the history of the Bureau of Motion Pictures, Dr. Myers has strongly countered the popular belief by film historians that the death of the agency was due to censorship. [This] entertaining account provides a fresh look at the BMP as it struggled to perform its duties, avoid the specter of blatant censorship, and cope with the needs for heightened security and strengthened domestic communication during the chaos of war.” – Prof. Vance W. Gipson, Odessa College

Table of Contents

Foreword Acknowledgements
Prologue
1. Early Movie Censorship, 1917-1940
2. The Bureau is Formed, 1941
3. The BMP in Hollywood
4. Mellett’s Troubles in Hollywood
5. The BMP at Work
6. On the Cutting Room Floor
7. Conclusions
Appendix A: Trading-with-the-Enemy
Appendix B: Legion of Decency Pledge
Appendix C: Roosevelt’s Appointment of Mellett
Appendix D: Mellett’s December Letter
Appendix E: Studio’s Letter to Mellett