Booker T. Washington - Interpretative Essays

Author: Adeleke, Tunde
Year:1998
Pages:192
ISBN:0-7734-8260-1
978-0-7734-8260-9
Price:179.95
Essays range from specific case studies of the impact of Washington’s career on African-Americans, through comparative discussions of his views and those of other African-American leaders, to a general overview of the state of historiography on this controversial black leaders.

Reviews

“By bringing together in one volume the contributions of these scholars and other equally provocative contributions, this book is bound to keep alive the on-going debate on the relevance of the Washingtonian legacy well into the new millennium.” – Johnson A. Adefila

“A subject matter like Booker T. Washington is one of the few in African American History that has been looked at until it almost has been over researched, but this volume still leaves the reader refreshed and raises new questions as to how a man from such humble beginnings rose to where he did rise. Was it simply an appeasement of white folks or did he truly mean to help black folks with his style of leadership ... the volume was very good reading.” – Howard Jones

Table of Contents

1. Settlement Houses and Black Progressives in the Age of Booker T. Washington: The Case of Plymouth in Louisville, Kentucky (Benjamin Berry)
2. Booker T. Washington’s Philosophy and Oklahoma’s African American Towns (Arthur L. Tolson)
3. Martin R. Delany and Booker T. Washington: Ideological Partners Separated by Time and Ideology (Tunde Adeleke)
4. Booker T. Washington and Marcus M. Garvey: Some Brief ‘Facts’ and Speculations (W. Baxter Wiggins)
5. Our Sister in Africa: Booker T. Washington’s Legacy Lives On (Augustine Konneh)
6. Speaking of Washington and Du Bois (Charles C. Jackson)
7. Booker T. Washington: The Mistaken Giant (Trellie L. Jeffers)
8. Booker T. Washington and the Preparation of African Americans for the Workplace: Would His Thought Be the Same Today? (Cornell Thomas)
9. Up From Disrepute: The Historiographical Accommodation of Booker T. Washington (Harvey G. Hudspeth)