Battered African American Women: A Study of Gender Entrapment

Author: Davis, Sharon Ellis
Year:2014
Pages:272
ISBN:0-7734-4316-9
978-0-7734-4316-7
Price:199.95
A daring new model for ending Domestic Violence, this research seeks to engage black liberation theology and other movements intended to empower African American people who face racial injustice, and its impact on African American battered women.

Reviews

“When Domestic Violence (DV) takes up residency in the home, terror and acts of terrorism turn the home upside down. This book is a bold step toward the development of a comprehensive strategy for ending domestic violence…Through critical theological, sociological, and ethical reflections Dr. Ellis Davis suggests important source materials and offers a new paradigm for saving the soul of the African American community.”
-Professor Lee H. Butler, Jr.
Chicago Theological Seminary


Peer Review(s): “Dr Ellis Davis’ book helps redirect the discourse on – and ultimately the practice of – domestic violence reduction efforts. She applies Beth Richie’s definition of gender entrapment in a prison context to the unique experiences of African American battered women, and considers the theological, ethical and Christological basis for the development of specific intervention strategies…we are intimately positioned to walk with those who are suffering, not to contribute to their voicelessness, but to advocate with and on behalf of them with a more comprehensive understanding of unique individual and social contexts. Dr. Ellis Davis’s book helps us to do just that. With compassion.”
-Dr. Kathryn Lyndes,
School of Social Work,
Loyola University Chicago


“In this substantive contribution to the social, scientific, and theological disciplines, she writes poignantly and powerfully as a survivor and as an advocate for other women survivors of domestic violence. Her work as a police chaplain gives her insight into the workings of the justice system, and her longstanding commitment to the Church grounds this work in the best of its prophetic and priestly traditions.”
-Associate Professor, JoAnne Marie Terrell,
Chicago Theological Seminary


Table of Contents

Foreword by Dr. Lee J. Butler, Jr.
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Point of Departure
Gender Entrapment
Research Methods
Chapter Outline
ONE
: Domestic Violence Theories and Criminal justice System Intervention
The Theory of Learned Behavior
The Loss of Control Theory
The Cycle of Violence Theory
Theories of Mutual Violence
The Theory of Power and Control
Critical Race Theory
Analysis
TWO: Gender Entrapment: Making the Connections
THREE: Black Church/Theological Discourse and Gender Entrapment
FOUR: Breaking the Silence: Womanist Discourse
FIVE: The Theological and Christological Paradox and Gender Entrapment
SIX: Conclusion: Where Do We Go From Here:
Theological and Ethical Reflection
Victim Language
The Social and Cultural Context that Gave Rise to African American Liberation Theologies
Bibliography
Index