Annotated Bibliography of Percussion Music Publication

Author: Larrick, Geary
Year:2005
Pages:152
ISBN:0-7734-6223-6
978-0-7734-6223-6
Price:159.95
This is an annotated bibliography of works published since 1976 by Per-Mus Publications LLC, of Columbus, Ohio, owned and founded by James L. Moore, Ph.D.. Dr. Moore is an Associate Professor of Music Emeritus at The Ohio State University, and continues to work as percussion instructor with the Ohio State University Marching Band, an organization of which this author is an alumnus. About one hundred fifty works are cited, with autobiographical memoirs of a professional nature interspersed in the manuscript.

This volume is a specific record of the publications produced by Dr. Moore's firm in twenty-eight years, including work of J.S. Bach, Leopold Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Frederic Chopin, Felix Mendelssohn, Ruth Stuber Jeanne, Gary Olmstead, James L. Moore, Geary Larrick, Murray Houllif, Jack Jenny and numerous others from contemporary and past history. Specifics of composition and percussion are cited, as well as the inclusion of many names associated with music and history.

The author is a native of Ohio, having studied with J.L. Moore during the 1964-65 school years at OSU, and collaborated with him in the interim. This book is a close-up look at percussion music publishing in the latter quarter of the 20th Century in the United States of America, involving a company that distributes widely including internationally. Fields of study that are discussed are education, music, percussion, history, theory, composition, arranging, business and basic scholarship.

Reviews

“[This book] is a review of some of the publications of James L. Moore, Dr. Larrick's percussion instructor and mentor at Ohio State. It is thus the story of a music publisher with emphasis on his publications. Moore took two degrees in music education at Ann Arbor before moving to Columbus in order to take another degree and teach percussion on the way. He completed his goals at Ohio State, finishing a Ph.D. in music theory (specializing in the acoustics of bar percussion instruments) while teaching percussion students. He taught there for 25 years, building the percussion studio to over 40 students(!) before retiring to emeritus status and further part-time work. Dr. Moore initiated the DMA in percussion at Ohio State and continued his professional interests on the side.

Dr. Moore expanded his field as an editor and publisher. He was, for instance, a founder of "Percussive Notes," which he edited for 18 years. However, only by forming his own company was he able to satisfy his quest to expand the repertoire of the percussive arts. He founded Per-Mus in 1976, his own company which became his outlet for advocacy. Although he published his own compositions and arrangements, he was primarily interested in the works of others, obscure percussion composers who could find no outlets for the publication of their own compositions, transcriptions, and arrangements. These are the works that Geary Larrick reviews in his new book. Here the reader finds not only the works of Bach, Mozart, and Weber, but also, alongside them, the likes of Jesse Ayers, Offenbach, and Stephen Weber. Women composers and arrangers such as Barbara Artino or Linda Dauwalder are easily identified by their first names in the contents and indices. However, names like Chiara, Lara, and Marquina also appear; they are either "nomes de plume" or titles of anonymous tunes.

As for styles and genres, the percussive arts again excel in variety and diversity the repertoire of other instruments. Here we find reviews of Moore's classical chamber music and symphonies (in transcription of course), as well as many mallet solos, crowd pleasers (Hungarian Dance No.5 or the Sabre Dance), drumset solos, exotica, and ethnic favorites. This book is certain to engage a wide audience. It will help percussion instructors identify recital literature, write program notes, and it will serve historians of the medium. Filled with personal asides, it will help young percussionists avoid the many pitfalls of a complex, competitive field in music performance and pedagogy. Readers will owe their thanks to both Dr. Larrick, the author, and Dr. Moore, the subject.” – (from the Commendatory Preface) Dr. Richard Pinnell (Ph.D., UCLA), Professor of Music , University of Wisconsin-La Crosse