An English Translation of the Poetry of Lucillius, a First-Century Greek Epigrammatist

Author: Lucillius
Lucillius
Year:2004
Pages:302
ISBN:0-7734-6488-3
978-0-7734-6488-9
Price:249.95
This volume offers for the first time facing-page translations into contemporary English of the entire body of Lucillius’ work, 140 epigrams. Classicists have established beyond question his significant influence on the development of the ancient epigram, such as his influence on Martial.

Reviews

“The epigrams are introduced by an essay which offers thorough and insightful discussion of all the major issues related to Lucillian scholarship….One of the great strengths of the introduction is that it gives the reader a good sense of the history of Lucillian scholarship; at the same time, it also describes the significance of the most recent work in this area. The bibliography which follows the epigrams is exhaustive….a work of skilled and careful scholarship that effectively reintroduces a poet whose place in the history of ancient Greek literature deserves recognition.” – Stylianos V. Spyridakis, Professor of Ancient Greek History, University of California, Davis

“Nystrom’s translations are easy and free-flowing, not an easy task when translating Greek poets in the Roman period. Nystrom is quite successful in conveying to the reader not only the scoptic character of each poem, the sarcasm and irony which are often understated in the original Greek (purposely), but also conveys this unstressed quality, which builds up the reader for the rather shocking or surprising punch line. Beyond the artful nature of the translation it is also accurate….Nystrom is careful to provide the necessary commentary, at the end of each poem, so as to inform the reader to allusions that are often not self-evident, even to a classicist…The commentaries are brief but meaty and carry a sharpness, usually psychological or social, as called for in the original of the Greek text….The presentation of the acknowledged corpus of the work, in one volume, is a further service, as it avoids the necessity to consult the Anthologia itself where it is scattered out over several volumes….The short bibliography at the end is an excellent serious introduction to: The works of Lucillius, the studies and editions of the Anthologia Palatina, and finally to the Greek epigram as a very lively, long lived epigrammatic literary tradition in the Ancient Greek dialects.” – Speros Vryonis, Jr., Emeritus Alexander S. Onassis Professor of Hellenic Civilization and Culture

Table of Contents

Table of Contents:
Preface by Burton J. Rozema
Foreword
Introduction
• The Epigram before Lucillius
• The Identity of Lucillius
• Lucillius and the Scoptic Epigram
• Character Types in Lucillius: Odd Bodies; Athletes; Physicians; Astrologers; Orators; Philosophers; Grammarians and Poets
• Text and Translations
Greek Text and Translations
Bibliography