American Presidential Election of 1924: A Political Study of Calvin Coolidge

Author: Ranson, Edward
Year:2008
Pages:1020
ISBN:0-7734-4838-1
978-0-7734-4838-4
Price:219.95
A reassessment of the political style and acumen of Calvin Coolidge during the 1924 presidential campaign, this study analyzes the presidential election campaign following the national conventions and discusses organisational and financial difficulties, and the popularity and impact of opinion polls and of radio.

Reviews

“Ted Ranson’s study allows us to obtain a much better appreciation of the man and especially of the way in which he managed to establish links to the electorate. This, plus his ability to demonstrate that he was not involved in corruption of the type made manifest in the Teapot Dome scandal, his open break with the Republican Old Guard and power brokers whom he replaced with his own team and his abrasive relations with an unpopular Congress all won him public trust. He emerges as an unexpectedly interesting and not unattractive figure.” – Prof. Roy Bridges, University of Aberdeen

“. . . Dr. Ranson advances a credible case for reassessing the political acumen of Coolidge and his campaign managers during the campaigns of 1923 and 1924. His volume is, however, far more than a study of Coolidge, the Republican Party, and the events of the 1924 election. The Democrats and Progressives are also given extensive consideration: and the social dimension of political activity (especially the emerging impact of radio) is covered in depth.” – Prof. David Ditchburn, University of Dublin

“. . . this comprehensive study fills the gap in the literature on both Calvin Coolidge and American Presidential Elections. . . . This study with its acute insights into contemporary political preoccupations . . . should be of value to both specialists and to students of the 1920s in America . . . “ ¬Prof. Rosemary M. Tyzack, University of Aberdeen

“Ranson’s writing is so vivid that one can feel almost as if one is in the Cleveland Public Auditorium, or in Madison Square Gardens in New York with the Democrats. . . . Ranson makes the point forcefully that, although Coolidge’s reputation has suffered over the past few decades, he was in fact a very shrewd and astute politician.” – Prof. Joyce A. Walker, University of Aberdeen