Pillai, Vijayan K. Books

Dr. Vijayan K. Pillai is a demographer with research interests in adolescent fertility, welfare issues, HIV/AIDS in Africa, women’s reproductive health in developing countries, and gender issues. He is currently investigating the impact of stigma on the psychosocial health of children living with parents with HIV in Botswana.

Designing a Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Program
2006 0-7734-5955-3
Pregnancy rates among teenagers in the United States are substantially higher than among teenagers in other developed countries. This occurs because U.S. teenagers use contraception less than their counterparts in other countries. Over the last quarter-century, programs developed to encourage American teenagers to use contraception have been very limited in their effectiveness.

In 1991, five recognized behavioral theorists came together in a workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health to develop an approach to curbing the spread of AIDS among high-risk populations. The authors of this book adapted the approach developed in the workshop to arrive at a theory on which they based a new approach to designing teenage pregnancy prevention programs. The new approach and the theory, Behavioral Performance Theory, are described in the book.

The theory holds that three factors are necessary and sufficient for a teenager to use effective contraception. This has two important implications. First, it explains why past programs have been so limited in their effectiveness: Unless all three factors are present, a teenager will not use contraception. Second, it augurs a future in which the effectiveness of teenage pregnancy prevention programs is greatly increased: If all three factors are present, a teenager will use effective contraception.

Welfare as We Know It a Family-Level Analysis of Afdc Receipt
1997 0-7734-8670-4
This book examines one of the nation's most important and controversial antipoverty programs: Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). Using three years of data from two counties in Wisconsin, the authors examine poverty, how families initially become and continue to be eligible for AFDC, how welfare can be studied using an Event History Analysis, and program evaluation. Unlike most studies of welfare receipt, this volume examines the AFDC-Basic and AFDC-Unemployed Parent programs separately. It is must reading for anyone interested in poverty, AFDC, welfare reform, and program evaluation. To make informed decisions about reforming welfare, we must have strong grasp of how the current system works, and this timely book accomplishes that complex and necessary task.