Moessner, Victoria Joan

Dr. Victoria Joan Moessner is Professor of German at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. She has published a number of English translations of German voyage literature, including Georg Heinrich von Langsdorff's A Voyage around the World, 1803-1806 (Limestone Press 1993) and The first Russian Voyage around the World: The Journal of Hermann Ludwig von Löwenstern, 1803-1806 (University of Alaska Press 2003). Her present research investigates the role of German scientists and Baltic German officers in Russian Service at the beginning of the nineteenth century.

Eine Kommentierte Transkription Der TagebÜcher Von Hermann Ludwig Von LÖwenstern. Band 1: 1793-1803
2005 0-7734-6176-0
The transcription of Hermann Ludwig von Löwenstem's uncensored diaries (1793-1815) gives the modem reader a rare insight into the life of a Baltic German Russian naval officer at the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th centuries. Löwenstem traveled the world from the Baltic to the Mediterranean and Black Seas, from Reval to Paris and back by way of Berlin (1793-1801), and from Kronstadt to Copenhagen, Falmouth, Tenerife, Brazil, Nuka Hiva, Kamchatka, Nagasaki, Canton, St. Helena, Scotland and back to Kronstadt (1803-1806), and finally to Archangelsk and the Crimea (1806-1815) before retiring to marry and run three estates in Estonia. Every human endeavor engaged his attention: a sailor's revolt in England; Russians rescuing Turkish sailors during race riots in Palermo; elegant balls attended by Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton; Napoleon reviewing troops in Paris; Abbe Sicard lecturing at the Institute for the Deaf and Dumb; Japanese playing psychological games on the Russian Ambassador, Nikolai Petrovich Rezanov; "fresh meat" being secretly ferried to foreign ships in Canton; the bathhouses in Istanbul; the unbearable life in the swampy hellhole of Archangelsk; and the Crimean sect practicing castration. These diaries are also a treasure trove for students of languages since Löwenstem wrote as he spoke, that is, Baltic German with admixtures of other languages from around the world.

Eine Kommentierte Transkription Der TagebÜcher Von Hermann Ludwig Von LÖwenstern. Band 2: Die Erste Russische Weltumsegelung 1803-1806, Teil 1
2005 0-7734-6191-4
The transcription of Hermann Ludwig von Löwenstern’s uncensored diaries (1793-1815) gives the modern reader a rare insight into the life of a Baltic German Russian naval officer at the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th centuries. Löwenstern traveled the world from the Baltic to the Mediterranean and Black Seas, from Reval to Paris and back by way of Berlin (1793-1801), and from Kronstadt to Copenhagen, Falmouth, Tenerife, Brazil, Nuka Hiva, Kamchatka, Nagasaki, Canton, St. Helena, Scotland and back to Kronstadt (1803-1806), and finally to Archangelsk and the Crimea (1806-1815) before retiring to marry and run three estates in Estonia. Every human endeavor engaged his attention: a sailor’s revolt in England; Russians rescuing Turkish sailors during race riots in Palermo; elegant balls attended by Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton; Napoleon reviewing troops in Paris; Abbe Sicard lecturing at the Institute for the Deaf and Dumb; Japanese playing psychological games on the Russian Ambassador, Nikolai Petrovich Rezanov; “fresh meat” being secretly ferried to foreign ships in Canton; the bathhouses in Istanbul; the unbearable life in the swampy hellhole of Archangelsk; and the Crimean sect practicing castration. These diaries are also a treasure trove for students of languages since Löwenstern wrote as he spoke, that is, Baltic German with admixtures of other languages from around the world.

This is the first volume of the two-volume Band 2.

Eine Kommentierte Transkription Der TagebÜcher Von Hermann Ludwig Von LÖwenstern. Band 2: Die Erste Russische Weltumsegelung 1803-1806, Teil 2
2005 0-7734-6130-2
The transcription of Hermann Ludwig von Löwenstern’s uncensored diaries (1793-1815) gives the modern reader a rare insight into the life of a Baltic German Russian naval officer at the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th centuries. Löwenstern traveled the world from the Baltic to the Mediterranean and Black Seas, from Reval to Paris and back by way of Berlin (1793-1801), and from Kronstadt to Copenhagen, Falmouth, Tenerife, Brazil, Nuka Hiva, Kamchatka, Nagasaki, Canton, St. Helena, Scotland and back to Kronstadt (1803-1806), and finally to Archangelsk and the Crimea (1806-1815) before retiring to marry and run three estates in Estonia. Every human endeavor engaged his attention: a sailor’s revolt in England; Russians rescuing Turkish sailors during race riots in Palermo; elegant balls attended by Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton; Napoleon reviewing troops in Paris; Abbe Sicard lecturing at the Institute for the Deaf and Dumb; Japanese playing psychological games on the Russian Ambassador, Nikolai Petrovich Rezanov; “fresh meat” being secretly ferried to foreign ships in Canton; the bathhouses in Istanbul; the unbearable life in the swampy hellhole of Archangelsk; and the Crimean sect practicing castration. These diaries are also a treasure trove for students of languages since Löwenstern wrote as he spoke, that is, Baltic German with admixtures of other languages from around the world.

This is the second volume of the two-volume Band 2.

Eine Kommentierte Transkription Der TagebÜcher Von Hermann Ludwig Von LÖwenstern. Band 3: 1806-1815
2005 0-7734-6126-4
The transcription of Hermann Ludwig von Löwenstern’s uncensored diaries (1793-1815) gives the modern reader a rare insight into the life of a Baltic German Russian naval officer at the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th centuries. Löwenstern traveled the world from the Baltic to the Mediterranean and Black Seas, from Reval to Paris and back by way of Berlin (1793-1801), and from Kronstadt to Copenhagen, Falmouth, Tenerife, Brazil, Nuka Hiva, Kamchatka, Nagasaki, Canton, St. Helena, Scotland and back to Kronstadt (1803-1806), and finally to Archangelsk and the Crimea (1806-1815) before retiring to marry and run three estates in Estonia. Every human endeavor engaged his attention: a sailor’s revolt in England; Russians rescuing Turkish sailors during race riots in Palermo; elegant balls attended by Lord Nelson and Lady Hamilton; Napoleon reviewing troops in Paris; Abbe Sicard lecturing at the Institute for the Deaf and Dumb; Japanese playing psychological games on the Russian Ambassador, Nikolai Petrovich Rezanov; “fresh meat” being secretly ferried to foreign ships in Canton; the bathhouses in Istanbul; the unbearable life in the swampy hellhole of Archangelsk; and the Crimean sect practicing castration. These diaries are also a treasure trove for students of languages since Löwenstern wrote as he spoke, that is, Baltic German with admixtures of other languages from around the world.