Gilliatt, Stephen Books

About the author: Stephen Gilliatt graduated from the University of Sussex with First Class Honours in Social Science, majoring in Politics and was awarded a D.Phil at the same University. He is currently Senior Lecturer at the University of Northumbria,

An Exploration Of The Dynamics Of Collboration And Non-resistance
2000 0-7734-7770-5
This book represents a major attempt to analyze collaboration from a perspective that explains its appeal without the use of pathological or amoral elements of betrayal, cowardice, individual and institutional self-interest that have intruded in previous studies. The author condenses and synthesizes the existing historical literature on the subject of collaboration during the Second World War and discerns a deeply held rational and moral integrity in the intentions of collaborators that give them the confidence to act and to defend themselves without regret, a philosophy comprising a logic of weakness, a normality imperative, a theory of the shield and an idea of manoeuvre through partnership. A novel and controversial feature of the book is the contention that this rational and moral discourse in collaborators reflects a ‘normal’ mode of adjustment to coercive power and social constraint. This is illustrated firstly through a case study of the Thatcher administration in Britain.

How The Poor Adapt To Poverty In Capitalism
2000 0-7734-7372-6
Drawing on a diverse literature from psychology, sociology and history, this study traces the ways in which those most detrimentally affected by the operation of the capitalist market economy manage their circumstances. Borrowing, begging, stealing, repair, emigration, family budgeting, second economy activity, solace and release are all explored. They are shown to have timeless and universal qualities underestimated by the political right with their emphasis on the poor’s intellectual weakness or cultural deviancy, and by the left in the hope or expectation of resistance.