Crump, R.W. Books

Dr. R.W. Crump is Professor of English at Louisiana State University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. She has edited the poems of English poet Christina Rossetti and American poet Donald E. Stanford.

Complete Poems of American Poet Donald E. Stanford, 1913-1998
2002 0-7734-7208-8
This is the first complete collection of Donald E. Stanford’s poems, including the three chapbooks he published, his privately printed poems, and all the extant manuscript poems he did not publish. The textual notes list all the authorial versions, naming the basic text and giving all the variant readings. Tables of Stanford’s editions and collections and their tables of contents are presented, and the appendices provide Stanford’s own statements about his life and poetry. A preface by David Middleton, a well-known poet and scholar in his own right, placed Stanford’s poetry in historical perspective and highlights the salient virtues of his poetic theory and practice.

Critical Study of the Works of Four British Writers
2007 0-7734-5546-9
Assigns a rightful place in the British literary canon to four authors wrongly forgotten or marginalized – Margaret Louisa Woods (1856-1945), Mary Coleridge (1861-1907), Sir Henry Newbolt (1862-1938) and R.C. Trevelyan (1872-1951). Each chapter on one of the four authors is subdivided into sections that present the writer’s life, followed by discussions of the writings, organized by genre (fiction, poetry, verse drama, and critical prose). Interwoven among these sections are connections between the author and other writers of the day, such as Alfred Lord Tennyson, Thomas Hardy, Robert Louis Stevenson, Henry James, and Robert Bridges. Stanford draws not only on published sources, but also on many unpublished sources, including letters (an appendix prints eight previously unpublished letters from Mary Coleridge and Robert Bridges, for example) to create a book about a literary period of dramatic transition as well as about four minor writers who deserve to have their reputations restored alongside those of the major figures with whom they interacted.

Hobo Life in the Great Depression
2005 0-7734-6024-1
In an age when the discovery and publication of forgotten or unknown texts, and the rediscovery of neglected works, are helping to expand the canon of literature with all its distinctively American characteristics, the publication of Edward C. Weideman’s book is a significant event. His writing provides a classic expression of the American experience sometimes labeled in literary studies as “modernism,” which encompasses the early twentieth-century search for the meaning of life in an era of social and economic breakdown, characterized by a sense of loss of a stable, secure world based on a belief in and reliance on absolute truth. The hobo narrative achieves a vividness, authenticity, and directness which might be termed “virtue of location,” drawing the reader into a time warp of Chinatown in Chicago and later the small-town life of Midwestern America in the 1930s, placing it in the tradition of such writers as Walt Whitman, John Steinbeck, Willa Cather, Sinclair Lewis, and Hamlin Garland. The three short stories, written at a time when that genre was receiving increasing recognition as a serious art form, include a poignant tale of a teenager’s rite of passage through humiliation over his father’s perceived lack of education to a profound respect for his father’s wisdom and courage, a story about two old maids who hatch a plot against their ailing older brother that ends in a delightfully humorous final twist, and a macabre tale of a bizarre series of events, reminiscent of Poe.

Month of Daily Meditations on Saintly Lives
2013 0-7734-4343-6
This book of devotional poetry is designed to provide an opportunity for readers to reflect on the lives of saintly individuals who in God's view brought the presence of Jesus Christ into the situations in their own lives, and who allowed God's purpose for them to be fulfilled thereby.