Hall, Ronald E. Books

About the author: Dr. Ronald E. Hall received his PhD from Atlanta University. He is currently assistant professor at Michigan State University. He has published numerous articles and reviews.

An Empirical Analysis of the Impact of Skin Color on African-american Education, Income, and Occupation
2005 0-7734-6120-5
The purpose of this study is to examine the dynamics between the various skin colors of African-Americans as pertains to their projected aspirations for education, occupation and income. The author utilized a questionnaire (CCC) which he subjected to validation techniques to compare the responses of light-, medium-, and dark-skinned participants. A random technique was employed to sample a freshmen population during the third quarter of their academic year. The results indicated that projected aspirations as per skin color is not irrelevant to perceived outcomes. In fact there was a significant correlation for the light- and medium-skinned participants. Light skin being the colonial ideal as per the author the Bleaching Syndrome among African-Americans is evident. This would suggest that the Eurocentric emphasis upon race be revised to incorporate skin color as a critical dynamic in American quality of life.

Discrimination Among Oppressed Populations
2003 0-7734-6817-X
This study will give readers new insight into skin color as a crux of Western discrimination including America and its non-white citizenry. That insight will characterize a seldom-discussed aspect of discrimination by analyzing its perpetration between and among African, Asian, Hispanic, native, feminist, and gay/lesbian Americans. It goes beyond the usual black/white dichotomy to examine the secret taboos of previously oppressed populations, and address the aftermath of colonization in the ways in which dark-skinned American – regardless of race – are perceived.

Scientific Fallacy and Political Misuse of the Concept of Race
2004 0-7734-6372-0
The scientific validity of race has always been assumed. In the Historical aftermath of the Atlantic slave trade race is in fact a complex and divisive fallacy profoundly woven into the fabric of American society. Subject to political directives, scholars have subsequently made assumptions about people based upon their racial heritage to realize political aspirations. Thus, the fallacy of race has been fundamental to political exploitation and racism in the 21st century. This book exposes this function of race as little more than a political tool to insure power and wealth remain the bastions of post-colonial power structures.

Skin Color as a Post-Colonial Issue Among Asian-Americans
2004 0-7734-6554-5
Local schools of thought dominated by the Black/White dichotomy have failed to take notice of the growing Asian presence in American life. The study of Asian-Americans in the post-colonial era can be neither understood nor assessed without a universal frame of reference. This study gives insight into the implications of skin color for Asian-Americans, characterizing the taboo concept of hierarchy as manifested on the basis of skin color.