M’Bayo, Ritchard Tamba

About the authors: Ritchard Tamba M’Bayo is an associate professor of mass communication in the Department of Communications at Bowie State University, Maryland. He is also Chairman of the Department. In 1996, he was nominated for the Willis H. Elkins Professorship of the University System of Maryland, and has served as a United Nations consultant in Mass Communications to the government of Sierra Leone. Chuka Onwumechili is an associate professor in the Department of Communications at Bowie State University, Maryland, where he also coordinates the graduate program in organized communication. Dr. Onwumechili has worked in Nigeria as a broadcast journalist, reporter, and then as a state government information officer. He is author of African Democratization and Military Coups, a 1998 Praeger publication. R. Nwafo Nwanko is a graduate professor of communications at Howard University where he coordinates the Mass Communications graduate program in the Department of Human Communications Studies. He has had significant professional experience as a journalist and information officer in Nigeria. Dr. Nwanko has received several honors and awards for academic excellence in teaching, research, and professional service.

Political Culture, Cultural Universals, and the Crisis of Identity in Africa. Essays in Ethnoglobalization
2011 0-7734-1390-1
This book examines the critical issues and trends in cultural transformation in Africa by examining the relationship between universal values and African cultures.

Press and Politics in Africa
2000 0-7734-7684-9
This book deals with the relations between public communications and politics in the context of the nation-state system in Africa. It adopts an approach that interweaves theory and practice and, in this sense, stands apart from previous, mostly descriptive studies. It begins with an overview that presents a general theoretical model of communication and influence processes in politics. Other chapters focus on the practical issues. The final chapter, noting that many of the state –press interaction problems are partly matters of politics and partly matters of interpretation, integrates the descriptions, suggestions, and prescriptions of the earlier chapters in an interpretive analysis that also serves as a guide for future research and policymaking.