Camara, Mohamed Saliou Books

An award winning educator, Mohamed Saliou Camara is a professor of History and International Relations in the Department of Security Studies & International Affairs at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Also a Northwestern University graduate with a Ph.D. in History and a Fulbright alumnus, he previously taught at the University of Conakry, broadcast for Radio Television of Guinea and served as a speechwriter at the Presidential Press Bureau of the Republic of Guinea. Professor Camara is the author of His Master’s Voice: Mass Communication and Single-Party Politics in Guinea under Sékou Touré(2005), Le pouvoir politique en Guinée sous Sékou Touré(2007), The Development of a Trans-National Region in West Africa (2011), Political History of Guinea since World War Two (2014), and Historical Dictionary of Guinea (Fifth Edition, with Thomas O’Toole and Janice Baker), (2014). His current research interests are centered on two areas: Human security and the question of regional integration and supranational governance in Africa; and Islam, hegemony and counter-hegemony in Africa from the Cold War to the global war on terror.

Development of a Trans-National Region in West Africa: Transcendingthe Politics of Sovereign Nation States
2010 0-7734-3700-2
This work presents a historical framework and a plan for reform of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). It is is based upon in-country investigations, surveys of published works, and a thorough examination of primary sources.

Is There a Distinctively African Way of Knowing? A Study of African Blacksmiths, Hunters, Healers, Griots, Elders, and Artists; Knowing and Theory of Knowledge in the African Experience
2015 1-4955-0277-5
This work investigates knowledge systems intrinsic to African civilizations to ascertain ways in which those systems can help validate or invalidate the argument pertaining to the existence of an African epistemology. This approach calls for a paradigm shift in conceptualizing and researching African epistemology free from Eurocentric and Afrocentric biases.