Mongkuo, Maurice Y.

Dr. Maurice Y. Mongkuo received his Ph.D. and MPIA degrees from the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and he received his B.A. with distinction from Kenyon College, Ohio. Dr. Mongkuo has served as consultant and technical advisor for several governments on race and minority business enterprise development policies and programs for over 10 years. He has authored and presented numerous articles, reports and monographs on race/ethnic relation policies and programs, government contracting disparities, minority business enterprise development, and targeted economic development programs. He is Associate Professor of Public Administration in the Department of Government and History at Fayetteville State University.

Does Privatization Contribute to Social Development? A Case Study From Tanzania
2010 0-7734-3696-0
This book provides an in-depth assessment of the impact of sustainable development reform through privatization of public functions on economic growth and human development in a developing country setting.

Race Preference Programs and the United States Supreme Court's Strict Scrutiny Standard of Review
2005 0-7734-5944-8
This study offers a legally and methodologically acceptable approach that governments can use to generate factual predicate for establishing compelling state interest in adopting race preference programs in government contracting under the United States Supreme Court’s strict scrutiny standard of review. Race preference programs are critical for increasing opportunities among minority firms to do business with government. These programs have come under judicial attack in recent years at both the state and federal government levels because they do not serve a “compelling state interest” to correct discrimination in the government contracting process. The courts rejected these programs as premised on evidence that do not offer a legally and methodologically acceptable probative explanation of the extent to which discrimination influence contract award to minority firms under the United States Supreme Court’s strict scrutiny standard. Using the City of St. Petersburg as the research setting, this study combines quantitative and qualitative approaches to determine probative explanation of the extent to which discrimination influence contract awards to minority-owned firms within the framework of the Supreme Court strict scrutiny standard. These approaches can be relied upon by any government entity to ascertain if race preference and/or race neutral remedial policies are warranted.