Ramblado-Minero, María Cinta Books

Dr. María Cinta Ramblado-Minero lectures in Spanish and Hispanic Studies in the Department of Languages and Cultural Studies at the University of Limerick, Ireland. She completed her PhD at that university. With an extensive background in comparative literature, Dr. Ramblado-Minero has published on gender-related issues with a special focus on Ireland, Latin America and Spain.

Isabel Allende’s Writing of the Self - Trespassing the Boundaries of Fiction and Autobiography
2002 0-7734-6864-1
This book is the first to look at all Allende’s fictional narratives to date, from The House of the Spirits to Portrait in Sepia, from the point of view of autobiography studies, and the re-creation of self-identity that takes place throughout her works.

Single Motherhood in 20th Century Ireland
2006 0-7734-5621-X
This book explores the cultural representations of unmarried motherhood in 20th-century Ireland from a variety of perspectives (literary and film studies, applied sociology and history) in order to analyze different discourses of femininity and motherhood. The book analyzes cultural artifacts in which the central theme is unmarried motherhood in an Irish context in order to outline and describe the different strategies at play in the representation, negotiation and contestation of traditional discourses of femininity which marginalize and, in some cases, erase women’s experience of lone parenthood.

This book emerges as a unique and up-to-date collaborative work of international scholars which contributes to the study of the aforementioned discourse. The collection achieves a detailed study of cultural practices from a variety of perspectives which include not only close literary analysis in the light of post-colonial and feminist theory but explorations in feminist history, sociology, film studies and cultural studies. The book examines how the discourse of deviance progressively becomes dominant in post-famine Ireland to refer to any sort of deviation from the female norm, and it explores the representation and denunciation of this discourse in a wide range of cultural artifacts in order to show their value as contributions to the re-inscription of women in social history.