Kibitlewski, Joseph L.

Dr. Kibitlewski earned his Ph.D. in Political Science / Criminal Justice from Clark Atlanta University, his M.A. in Political Science from Mississippi State University and his B.A. from the University of Texas at Arlington. In his thirty-two years of professional experience, Dr. Kibitlewski has not only been a Professor of Criminal Justice at colleges and universities, he has also been a law enforcement officer as well as a consultant on training to institutions that include the U.S. Department of Justice. He is currently a Professor and Program Director of Criminal Justice at International College in Florida.

Comparison of a Citizen’s Right to Silence Under American and English Political Systems
2004 0-7734-6347-X
Politics being what they are give rise to the dynamic changes that appear to be constant. These political changes reflect the desire for structural change as well. Basic to the structure of any nation is its commitment to a fundamental set of principles. This usually takes the form of a written Constitution. Outside research combined with unfulfilled expectations mesh with one another. The citizens must be convinced that the new government is indeed superior to that which was displaced. This work can be an example of how two very successful political systems provide stability within their populations.

The Constitution of the United States has experienced over two hundred years of peaceful changes in leadership. Great Britain bears witness to a similar history of stability. This is because the citizens of both these countries respect and trust their governments. The trust is warranted because protections from abuses of government are proscribed by law. This work is but a small example of what is possible if the government and the citizens have a clear and defined framework within which to exist. Exhaustive research was conducted and has been combined with a writing style that enables one to fully understand the underlying legal principles presented.