Greene, John T. Books

Dr. John T. Greene is Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. Dr. Greene holds a Ph.D. in Scriptural and Historical Studies/History of Religions from Boston University in Massachusetts.

How Jonah Is Interpreted In Judaism, Christianity, And Islam
2011 0-7734-3931-6
This collection of essays is the first to examine the role of Jonah within the broader context of Nevi’im as interpreted by scholars of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The book provides multiple interpretations from a variety angles on the parable of Jonah. Such analyses include examining the tale from the perspectives of sin, drama, animal rights, education, and visual representations. At the same time, the book engages other biblical and prophetic texts. Despite the sheer depth and breadth of the subject, the book remains accessible to academics and non-academics alike.

Parables And Fables As Distinctive Jewish Literary Genres
2012 0-7734-2598-5
A book that concerns itself with the historical development of the fable or parable as a way of communicating knowledge and truth, in both Judaism and Christianity.

Problems In Translating Texts About Jesus: Proceedings From The International Society Of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting, 2008
2011 0-7734-3753-3


The Concept Of The Christ In St.paul's Thought: The Nature Of Communication Among Humans And Between God And Humans
2012 0-7734-4080-1
CHRIST in Paul’s Thought is concerned with religious ideas of the nature of communication between God and humans, and between humans and humans as presented in the undisputed correspondence of the Apostle Paul. This communication scheme is compared and contrasted with texts understood as post-Pauline glosses, pseudo-Pauline, and deuteron-Pauline literature, as well as apocryphal texts pertaining to the Apostle to determine whether the communication scheme demonstrated in the communications agent, Paul, operate in unison to bring to dejected humankind a communication scheme of God’s – through Christ – salvific activity and telos. Paul’s concept of CHRIST’S function in this scheme is tied to both ancient Israel’s understanding of the covenant, and the Greco-Roman world’s failure through its philosophical and religious teachings to assuage and/or resolve human despair. By his understanding of CHRIST, Paul represents him as both the specific savior agent for traditional Israel, as well as for universal “Israel,”: the Church. Membership in this Church/”Israel” has the power to resolve the despair.

The Figure Of Samson In Jewish, Christian, And Islamic Traditions: The Myth And The Man
2014 0-7734-4278-2
This remarkable literary journey of the enigmatic ‘Samson’ titillates the reader’s curiosity. Blessed with a handsome and spectacular physique, and a naughty thirst for la dolce vita, Samson has served as a paradigm for many a well-meaning person who failed to teach himself self-restraint. Caspi and Greene chronicle the fascinating literary-historical development of the Samson figure and his significance through Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions, and during ancient, medieval, and modern times.


The Interpretation Of Korah's Rebellion In Three Religious Traditions - Jewish, Christian, Muslim: A Study In Comparative Reception History
2012 0-7734-2923-9
The book addresses the ways the myth of Korah is depicted in three faith traditions: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. Dialogue between religions always existed. Unfortunately, many times this dialogue was hateful if not bloody. All those who claimed God had spoken to them allowed themselves to kill in his name too. This book categorizes the history of how God revealed himself to people in these religions. The story of Korah’s rebellion against Moses is documented in the Torah. It is narrated in Numbers 16:1-40. Korah’s rebellion resisted Moses’s leadership, and concluded in his people being swallowed by the earth along with many of their households. The children were salvaged and did not die. However, this story serves as a metaphor for resisting the will of God.

The authors central argument is that the story of Korah has been invoked in various religious traditions that appeal to the Bible to highlight the authority of dominant institutions that face criticism. The volume’s comparative attention is given to how the story is depicted in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam as the paradigmatic rebellion.