Naish, John M.

Interwoven Lives of George Vancouver, Archibald Menzies, Joseph Whidbey and Peter Puget the Vancouver Voyage of 1791-95
1996 0-7734-8857-X
The Vancouver Voyage exemplifies the extraordinary upsurge in optimism and adventure in the last two decades of the 18th century. Four men were the lynch-pins of that enterprise and this volume examines their achievements and sufferings. It particularly examines the interplay and stress between the men, both physical and psychological, during the voyage. Evidence as to the nature of Vancouver's own chronic disease (which killed him in his 41st year) is presented, and his psychological state is analysed. The achievement of both Vancouver and Menzies in defeating scurvy during the voyage is described. Menzies' largely unpublished and voluminous journal provides the major source of information on the lands explored and the peoples encountered, and the work also contains original material about Whidbey's later life and relationships. Although unusual in format, this work seeks to illuminate the history of those times by applying a physician's eye to four outstanding representatives of an age of optimism. With nineteen photos and eight maps.

Physician's Eye
1997 0-7734-8662-3
Many medical men, like Chekhov and Somerset Maugham, observe their fellow men with what the author, a doctor, calls a physician's eye: the ability to observe objectively without much sentimentality. Doctor Naish's observations are collected into chapters entitled My Mother and her Beloved Anglesey Landscape; Some Memories of Youth; Learning Medicine; The Sea; Beyond the Western World; and Medical Toil and the Healing Earth. Memories of the Hebrides, two World Wars, prep school and Cambridge, service in the Royal Navy during WWII as medical officer, sojourns in Asia and Africa, and the medical profession itself are recalled in clear and vivid language.