Jung, Jiseok Books

Dr. Jiseok Jung is a director of Korea Christian Peace Institute (KCPI) and teaches Ethics of Peace and Peace Education at Hanshin Graduate School and Songkonghoe NGO Graduate School in Korea. A Korean theologian who has served at a minjung church, the Korean National Council of Churches, Korean Christian Academy, and UNESCO-Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding (APCEIU) in Korea, Dr. Jung studied Theology (M.Div) in Korea and Ecumenics (M.Phil) in Ireland, and he received his Ph.D. from Sunderland University.

Ham Sŏkhŏn’s Pacifism and the Reunification of Korea
2006 0-7734-5651-1
This book explores the extent to which Ham Sŏkhŏn’s Quaker involvement affected his approach to Korean Reunification Theology (KRT), and the degree to which elements of KRT can be located within Quaker Peace Testimony (QPT). For this, QPT, Ham’s ideas of peace, and KRT are explored in turn, and in particular Ham’s ideas of peace are considered as a bridge between QPT and KRT.

It is suggested that the twentieth-century QPT was peace-centric, tolerant, and based in pluralism clearly different from the nineteenth century anti-war testimony. It is argued that liberal Quakerism influenced the shifts of QPT. Conscientious Objection and relief are considered as concrete expressions of the twentieth century QPT.

Ham S?kh?n’s ideas of peace are analyzed in terms of three key ideas: pacifism, non-violence and the minjung. It is argued that Ham’s Christian pacifism was awakened by the QPT and it stimulated Ham’s ideas of peace. It is also suggested that Ham’s Quaker experience was parallel to his pacifist practice. The book explores the thought that Ham’s ideas of reunification are based on his ideas of peace, and that they influence KRT. Five reunification theologians’ thinking and key ideas are explored and then Ham’s influence on them is considered. It is suggested that QPT and Ham’s ideas of peace share common ground in their ideas of pacifism, non-violence and humanitarianism (of the minjung), and that KRT was influenced by Ham’s ideas of reunification particularly in regard to his ideas of peace. Consequently, connection between the QPT and KRT can be considered through Ham’s ideas of peace.

This book proves that there is a connection between parts of QPT, Ham’s ideas of peace and KRT, provides an original contribution to knowledge, and increases the academic understanding of both Ham’s life and thought, and the nature of KRT.