Conyers, James L. Jr.

Dr. James L. Conyers Jr. is Director of the African American Studies Program and Professor of African American Studies at the University of Houston. He holds a Ph.D. from Temple University. Dr. Conyers is the author or editor of 21 books and serves on the editorial boards of The Journal of Black Studies, The Western Journal of Black Studies, The International Journal of Africana Studies, The Journal of Negro Education, and The Journal of African American Studies.

Reevaluating the Pan-africanism of W. E. B. Dubois and Marcus Garvey
2006 0-7734-5954-5
The aim and objective of this book is to examine four associated topics: (1) global Pan Africanism; (2) the intellectual ideas of Dr. W.E.B. Du Bois; (3) the cultural and economic ideas of Marcus Garvey; and (4) a critical assessment of Africana historiography. Centered within each chapter, contributors have provided an interdisciplinary analysis of issues and schema that address Africana phenomena from a social service lens. Likewise, the objective for coordinating this work makes an ongoing advance and contribution to the forward flow of research and data in the field of Africana studies. Additionally, the assembly of essays in this volume aspires to offer an alternative analysis to examining the perplexities and dispatches regarding the construct of institutional and individual systematic subordination on an international level.

Structural Analysis of Enslavement in the African Diaspora
2001 0-7734-7435-8
This assembly of essays probes the enslavement of African people from an interdisciplinary perspective. It examines Europe, the Caribbean, the United States, and indentured servitude in Africa itself. “In sum, Dr. Conyers’ research in this manuscript is groundbreakin, seeking to provide a greater breadth and depth of insight on enslavement from the standpoint of the Africa. . . . he has simultaneously set a high standards for scholarly research in both the academy and the discipline of Africana Studies while offering a thoughtful view of the Africana experience from the standpoint of African people’s plight in enslavement worldwide.” – Andrew P. Smallwood