Falk, Gerhard Books

Dr. Gerhard Falk is Professor of Sociology at Buffalo State College of the State University of New York system (SUNY). He earned his E.D. from SUNY Buffalo. Dr. Falk has also taught at the University of Pennsylvania and South Dakota State College.

Deviant Nurses and Improper Patient Care
2006 0-7734-5967-7
This book describes that segment of the nursing profession who deviate from the expectations of the public in the performance of their duties. There is a chapter on male nurses, not because they necessarily create the kinds of dangers described in other chapters, but because the very idea of “male nurses” creates “cognitive dissonance” in the context of the American division of labor.

The concept of “cognitive dissonance” is explored in connection with male nurses but fits the entire study here because the very word “nurse” implies a concern for the sick and needy, which some nurses negate by their actions.

Those actions are described in this book. The cases presented here are the product of hearings conducted by a State Board of Nursing over several years. The present author has been a member of such a board for more than a decade and has considerable insight into the failures of some members of the nursing profession and the dangers this presents to patients.

Life of the Academic Professional in America an Inventory of Tasks, Tensions, and Achievements
1990 0-88946-797-8


Man’s Ascent to Reason - The Secularization of Western Culture
2003 0-7734-6956-7


Study of Social Change in Six American Institutions During the Twentieth Century
1993 0-7734-9358-1
The six institutions discussed are family, religion, education, government, medicine and economics. This corresponds to the content of sociology courses as taught in universities, and has the merit of reviewing the condition of each of these institutions in light of the 1990 census or of statistics gathered since then. The volume first presents statistics concerning change in such areas as immigration, family size, cost of living, age, ethnic composition, etc., since the beginning of the 20th century and before. The book includes interviews with older Americans who have lived through much of this century, and in each area discussed, interviews were conducted with persons most qualified to speak to each topic. The book also shows the relationship of these institutions to each other, employing functional analysis, and concludes with some predictions for future changes in American life during the remainder of the century. A useful bibliography containing over three hundred items is attached.