Blair, George A. Books

George A. Blair, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus in Philosophy at Thomas More College in northern Kentucky, has had a lifelong interest in Scripture and in how to translate ancient Greek into acceptable, contemporary English. He has published a translation of Plato’s Republic and a study of the Synoptic Gospels.

New Testament: An Idiomatic Translation
2006 0-7734-6103-5
This translation attempts several things: first, it tries to be faithful both to the Greek and the English languages, giving ordinary English for ordinary Greek words, avoiding “Biblical” jargon. Second, the English reflects the individual style and personality of Greek writers. Third, the documents appear in the order they were actually written, enabling the reader to follow the earliest development of Christian thought. Fourth, the little introductions reveal the psychological context of the documents, showing the motivation behind them. Finally, the introductions show how the documents reveal whether their religious dimension was attached to or grew out of the actual facts that happened historically.

The first volume, “Early Letters” consists of the letters of Paul, James, Peter, Jude and Hebrews, arranged in the following order: First and Second Thessalonians, Galatians, First Corinthians, James, the second half of Second Corinthians, the first half of Second Corinthians, Romans, Hebrews, Philippians, Philemon, “Ephesians,” Colossians, First Timothy, First Peter, Titus, Second Timothy, Jude, Second Peter. The reason for the documents’ placement is explained in the introductions to each one.

In the second volume, “The Master’s Life,” the documents’ order is Mark’s report of the Good News, Luke’s Report, Matthew’s Report, and the Acts of the Emissaries. Again, the reason for the order is explained in the introduction to the volume and the introductions to the individual Reports.

The third volume, “Further Revelation,” comprises the words of John, in the following order: The second letter of John, the third letter of John, the first letter of John, John’s Report of the Good News, and Revelation. Since Revelation does not speak for itself, a commentary is supplied, giving the passages from the Old Testament that are quoted and the number-symbolism that is used, including the number of times the nouns are repeated, forming a key to the meaning of the various numbers.

New Testament: An Idiomatic Translation
2006 0-7734-6021-7
This translation attempts several things: first, it tries to be faithful both to the Greek and the English languages, giving ordinary English for ordinary Greek words, avoiding “Biblical” jargon. Second, the English reflects the individual style and personality of Greek writers. Third, the documents appear in the order they were actually written, enabling the reader to follow the earliest development of Christian thought. Fourth, the little introductions reveal the psychological context of the documents, showing the motivation behind them. Finally, the introductions show how the documents reveal whether their religious dimension was attached to or grew out of the actual facts that happened historically.

The first volume, “Early Letters” consists of the letters of Paul, James, Peter, Jude and Hebrews, arranged in the following order: First and Second Thessalonians, Galatians, First Corinthians, James, the second half of Second Corinthians, the first half of Second Corinthians, Romans, Hebrews, Philippians, Philemon, “Ephesians,” Colossians, First Timothy, First Peter, Titus, Second Timothy, Jude, Second Peter. The reason for the documents’ placement is explained in the introductions to each one.

In the second volume, “The Master’s Life,” the documents’ order is Mark’s report of the Good News, Luke’s Report, Matthew’s Report, and the Acts of the Emissaries. Again, the reason for the order is explained in the introduction to the volume and the introductions to the individual Reports.

The third volume, “Further Revelation,” comprises the words of John, in the following order: The second letter of John, the third letter of John, the first letter of John, John’s Report of the Good News, and Revelation. Since Revelation does not speak for itself, a commentary is supplied, giving the passages from the Old Testament that are quoted and the number-symbolism that is used, including the number of times the nouns are repeated, forming a key to the meaning of the various numbers.

New Testament: An Idiomatic Translation
2006 0-7734-6061-6
This translation attempts several things: first, it tries to be faithful both to the Greek and the English languages, giving ordinary English for ordinary Greek words, avoiding “Biblical” jargon. Second, the English reflects the individual style and personality of Greek writers. Third, the documents appear in the order they were actually written, enabling the reader to follow the earliest development of Christian thought. Fourth, the little introductions reveal the psychological context of the documents, showing the motivation behind them. Finally, the introductions show how the documents reveal whether their religious dimension was attached to or grew out of the actual facts that happened historically.

The first volume, “Early Letters” consists of the letters of Paul, James, Peter, Jude and Hebrews, arranged in the following order: First and Second Thessalonians, Galatians, First Corinthians, James, the second half of Second Corinthians, the first half of Second Corinthians, Romans, Hebrews, Philippians, Philemon, “Ephesians,” Colossians, First Timothy, First Peter, Titus, Second Timothy, Jude, Second Peter. The reason for the documents’ placement is explained in the introductions to each one.

In the second volume, “The Master’s Life,” the documents’ order is Mark’s report of the Good News, Luke’s Report, Matthew’s Report, and the Acts of the Emissaries. Again, the reason for the order is explained in the introduction to the volume and the introductions to the individual Reports.

The third volume, “Further Revelation,” comprises the words of John, in the following order: The second letter of John, the third letter of John, the first letter of John, John’s Report of the Good News, and Revelation. Since Revelation does not speak for itself, a commentary is supplied, giving the passages from the Old Testament that are quoted and the number-symbolism that is used, including the number of times the nouns are repeated, forming a key to the meaning of the various numbers.

Synoptic Gospels Compared
2003 0-7734-6814-5
For over two centuries of controversy has raged over priority of writing among Matthew, Mark, and Luke (the Synoptic Problem), with no solution to date that does not bristle with difficulties. But there is one approach that has not been considered: that Mark wrote the first Gospel, Luke revised and expanded it into his version, and Matthew re-edited Marks Gospel, also using and editing Luke along with it. Once this approach is taken, the complexities and difficulties suddenly vanish. This book shows this by putting all the texts side by side, typographically pointing up similarities and differences, and showing the implications in each section for the different possible solutions to the Synoptic Problem. In addition to establishing solidly the Matthew-last hypothesis, the book provides a resource for scholars testing other theories, since the data are there at their fingertips, clearly marked. Anyone interested in a given text of one evangelist can also discover with ease just what the other two Synoptic authors did with the same incident.