Schleiermacher, Friedrich Books

Brief Outline of Theology as a Field of Study
1990 0-88946-359-X
Gives Schleiermacher's own distinctive theory of theological study as he presented it at the University of Berlin in 1811.

Brouillon zur Ethik/ Notes on Ethics (1805/1806). Translated and edited by John Wallhauser; notes on the Theory of Virtue (1804/1806); translated with introduction and notes by Terrence N. Tice
2002 0-7734-7156-1
During 1804-05 and 1805-06, while teaching at the University of Halle, Friedrich Schleiermacher lectured twice on philosophical ethics. From the first lectures only his notes on the theory of virtue are extant. In 1805-1806, however, we have his own dense notes covering 98 hours of lectures. He planned to revise this (Brouillon zur ethik) for publication, a project which was never completed. But these Halle lectures reveal for the first time the details of his distinctive approach to ethics as a philosophy of culture. In these lectures he presents ethics as the critical examination of reason embodied in selves in community. This translation makes available in English the first systematic presentation of his ethics as an inclusive vision of cultural goods, virtues and duties.

Christian Household: A Sermonic Treatise
1991 0-88946-360-3
Nine sermons, covering such topics as marriage, child-rearing, hospitality, charity, and domestic staff.

Christmas Eve
1991 0-7734-9890-7


Fifteen Sermons of Friendrich Schleiermacher Delivered to Celebrate the Beginning of a New Year
2003 0-7734-6628-2
This volume contains fifteen extant sermons and four extant sermon outlines that span a period of 43 years, from 1791 to 1834. What marks these sermons as special is not only their timing and context but also their finding ways to anticipate a conjoining of more general (secular) and religious Christian actions and their corresponding points of view. The study also contains a brief review of To Cecilie, On What Gives Value to Life, the Soliloquies, and Christmas Eve: A Dialogue, works written within the time frame of the first five New Year Sermons. These works offer insight into Schleiermacher’s appreciation of human frailty, of moral development, and enhance the readings of the New Year sermons

Luke. A Critical Study
1993 0-7734-9326-3
Schleiermacher's Luke (1817) displays what he took to be an accurate portrayal of the Redeemer's self-proclamation within the early church. This brilliant exegetical work specializes in higher-critical techniques then emerging. In particular, his use of redaction criticism in effect serves to discover "Q" and is scarcely surpassed in Lukan studies today. This portrayal is also crucial for his epoch-making Christian Faith (1821-1822). Editor Terrence N. Tice offers emendations to the 1825 translation by Connop Thirwall and essays placing the original and translated editions in historical perspective. The considerable appartus includes an analytical index on Luke passages with references to sermons and the Life of Jesus lectures, hereby resurrecting an important work virtually inaccessible for over 130 years.

On Freedom
1992 0-7734-9583-5
This is an analysis of ethical principles based upon "determinism" - a perspective that Schleiermacher defines with care and elaborates with originality. This early treatise (1790-92) is a seminal work for Schleiermacher's career and a significant contribution to the study of ethics. This translation make Schleiermacher's treatise available in English for the first time. The introductory essay traces the history of the text, discusses the philosophical background, and surveys his associated writings. It also provides a comprehensive summary of the treatise's arguments and comments on related secondary literature

On the Highest Good
1992 0-7734-9585-1
This text supplies the first full English translation of Schleiermacher's earliest extant essay. The translation includes most of the footnotes provided by the Kritische Gesamtausgabe, and adds others to show the relation between Schleiermacher's discussion and other philosophical works. The Postscript is an historical philosophical analysis of the text. Previous scholarly studies of the text are also reviewed and evaluated.

On What Gives Value to Life
1995 0-7734-9041-8
More than any of his earliest philosophic essays (before 1799), this 1792-1793 essay comprehensively anticipates major themes to be fully established over the next fifteen years of his authorship. It also presages late-19th century interests in value theory and philosophy of life, offering an argued, distinctive position against still-regnant alternative views of happiness, virtue and fate. Like others of the earliest essays, this one makes almost no direct reference to religion, yet it breathes throughout of a down-to-earth spirituality, a profound sense for the whole, including the whole of humanity, and an appreciation of ways joy can arise in the smallest and most unpleasurable of circumstances -- all characteristic features of his later thought. Particularly in its frequent autobiographical allusions and descriptive flourishes, it also bears the lineaments of "rhapsody" to be found in his subsequent notable works On Religion, Soliloquies and Christmas Eve. Though written when he was 24, it was not published in full until 1984, and appears here in English for the first time. The translators have appended an introduction, notes, and detailed index.

Reformed But Ever Reforming: Sermons in Relation to the Celebration of the The Handing Over of the Augsburg Confession (1830)
1997 0-7734-8484-1
This sermonic treatise discusses some basic concerns regarding confession of faith within the German Evangelical church. It is both affirming and critical of the Augsburg Confession, handed over to the Emperor Charles V in 1530. Unified in mood and presentation, they comprise a companion volume to an ethical sermonic treatise on The Christian Household (Mellen, 1991).