Dame, Frederick W. Books

Frederick William Dame has doctorate degrees in political science, and philology from the University of the Saar and the University of Koblenz-Landau, respectively.

History of Switzerland Volume One : Prehistorical Switzerland
2001 0-7734-7450-1
This work in three volumes is about the geological, environmental, cultural, political, sociological, international, etc., development of Switzerland, from the Big Bang to the Future.

Series ISBN: 0-7734-7417-X

History of Switzerland Volume Three: Modern Switzerland
2001 0-7734-7250-9
This work in three volumes is about the geological, environmental, cultural, political, sociological, international, etc., development of Switzerland, from the Big Bang to the Future.

Series ISBN: 0-7734-7417-X

History of Switzerland Volume Two
2001 0-7734-7386-6
This work in three volumes is about the geological, environmental, cultural, political, sociological, international, etc., development of Switzerland, from the Big Bang to the Future.

Series ISBN: 0-7734-7417-X

Jean Jacques Rousseau and Political Literature in Colonial America Revised Edition
2001 0-7734-8919-3
This completely revised and expanded edition examines the political thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau within the framework of Romanticism and how it applies to the areas of nature, human nature, society, and political development. It traces his influence and non-influence in the writings of Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, the Connecticut Wits (especially Joel Barlow) , Royall Tyler, and Hugh Henry Brackenridge. It places emphasis on where these writers overlap and disagree. Applicable quotations – but not taken out of context - from the original French of Rousseau's works Émile, Du Contrat Social, Discours sur l'Inegalité, etc., (with English translations) are compared with notable examples from the above-mentioned authors. Based upon these comparisons, the author makes well-founded conclusions concerning the political outcome of the American Revolution and the ensuing development of an American national identity. Of particular importance in this regard is the chapter on the Melody of Politics, in which the author argues the cause of Romanticism and the role of Rousseau and American music in the formation of political attitudes that not only had immanence, but influenced national identity. Since there is relatively little research on Rousseau's influence in the life of colonial America, this book, which is almost double the length of the first edition, makes a scholarly and lasting contribution to this field in particular, as well as to Rousseau research in general.

Revised edition 2001

Roots of American Character Identity: From the Age of Exploration to the American Enlightenment
2010


Roots of American Character Identity: From the Age of Exploration to the American Enlightenment
2009 0-7734-4774-1


Roots of American Character Identity: From the Heght of Colonialism to the Beginnings of Federalism
2010 0-7734-4776-8


United States of America as an Emerging World Power 1890-1920
2003 0-7734-6601-0
This study is one of the very few books that deals with how the United States changed its foreign policy from one-sided neutrality (i.e. its self-recognition as being neutral) to a policy of becoming an active belligerent as an associate power on the side of the allied powers, France and Great Britain. The study shows that the roots of America’s becoming an international power lie with the Monroe Doctrine and its numerous corollaries, and that politics of overseas possessions had already begun in 1859 with the claiming of the Midway Islands, in 1869 with the purchase of Alaska, continuing with the Spanish-American War, the Panama Canal, and Gunboat Diplomacy. All these developments, up to and including WWI, are discussed in light of the prevailing economic aspects of colonialism, foreign policy, and the framework of British, French, German, and American propaganda. The discussion of the sinking of the Lusitania includes the latest research. The presentation of the Zimmermann Telegram includes a new examination of the original coded copy of the telegram and a new English translation thereof, contrasted against the official translation as found in the Congressional document. The book’s appendices include Woodrow Wilson’s Peace Without Victory and War Message speeches; Senator George Norris’s and Senator Robert M. LaFollette’s anti-war speeches before Congress; and Wilson’s Fourteen Points with counter-arguments of Theodore Roosevelt.