Best, Felton O'Neal

Black Religious Leadership From the Slave Community to the Million Man March Flames of Fire
1998 0-7734-8345-4
This study breaks new ground, challenging the myth that black leaders have been self-serving and historically conservative in the quest of political and economic empowerment. This interdisciplinary project features scholars in African-American Studies, Philosophy, Religious Studies, Women's Studies, History, Communication, Political Science, Social Work and Organizational Behavior.

Black Resistance Movements in the United States and Africa, 1800-1993. Oppression and Retaliation
1995 0-7734-9053-1
This collection of new interdisciplinary studies focuses on black resistance patterns in literature, humor, art, cinema, history, and science, from the antebellum South to contemporary Brooklyn. Essays include: Elderly Female Slaves of the Antebellum South: Stabilizers and Resisters (Stacey K. Close); Throwing Off the Slaveholder: Free Black Ohioans and the Civil War (Felton O. Best); Resistance to European Conquest of Africa (Don C. Ohadike); 'Ode to Ethiopia': Challenging the Color Line Through Alliance Building, Yet Preserving the Soul, the Early Resistance Strategy of Paul Laurence Dunbar (Felton O. Best); Causes of the Atlanta Riot of 1906 (Gregory Mixon); The Protest Against 'Insult': Black Soldiers, World War II, and the 'War' for 'Democracy' at Home (Joyce Thomas); Ambivalent Allies: African Americans and American Jews After World War II (Cheryl Greenburg); Malcolm X, David Walker, and William Lloyd Garrison: Gaining Freedom "By Any Means Necessary" (Donald M. Jacobs); Resisting European Christianity: The Rise of Black Holiness-Pentecostal Culture in Brooklyn (Clarence Taylor); African-American Humor: Resistance and Retaliation (Joseph Boskin); Completing the Picture: African Americans and Independent Cinema: An Urban Genre Case Study (Marshall Hyatt).