Hutchison, Earl R.

Dr. Earl R. Hutchison has had a diverse professional and academic career. After serving in three infantry divisions during and between World War II and the Korean War, ending as a 1st Lt. and jumpmaster in the 82nd (30th, 24th, 82nd), he earned degrees leading to his Ph.D. at the main campuses of Illinois, Missouri and Wisconsin. He worked on a weekly newspaper as an assistant editor, on a small daily as assistant managing editor and on a larger daily as a general assignment reporter. As professor of English/Journalism at Tennessee Technological University, he directs the English-Communications program. In addition to having a television play produced by CBS-TV, he has books published by Grove Press (Tropic of Cancer on Trial), John Wiley & Sons (Mass Media and the Law – co-editor) and Longman (Writing for Mass Communication). Numerous stories and articles have appeared in newspapers and magazines.

Dr. Hutchison will be a presenter at the Scotland International Conference on the Arts in Society in August 2006. The theme for this year's conference is "Keeping Memory Alive: The Mine Wars in the US and UK." This interdisciplinary colloquium will be presented in the arts and collective memory section of the conference. The session will combined literature, film and drama on coal miners, strikers and subsequent violence. Participants will include scholars, filmmakers, and dramatists from the United States and United Kingdom. Dr. Hutchison will read a chapter from his recently published book, Growing Up on the Illinois Prairie During the Great Depression and the Coal Mine Wars: A Portrayal of the Way Life Was.

Growing Up on the Illinois Prairie During the Great Depression and the Coal Mine Wars
2006 0-7734-6004-7
Earl Hutchison has written a beguiling yet incisive memoir of growing up in a small town in central Illinois in the 1930s. Writing in a casual and engaging way, the author evokes a past that was pastoral and idyllic for a young boy, yet at the same time somber and precarious for his family and community because of the deprivations of the Depression and ominous tensions of the coal-mining dangers and disputes that haunted his family. The times were hard and challenging, but the people we meet reflect some of the best traits of the American character – tough, resilient, adaptive, and, above all, caring about their family and their community.