Das, Dilip K. Books

Dr. Dilip K. Das, Ph.D. is Professor of Criminal Justice. He is the Founder/President of International Police Executive Symposium which is a government registered not-for-profit educational corporation for the service of the world police. Dr. Das is also the Founder/Editor-in-Chief, Police Practice and Research: An International Journal (PPR) published by Routledge/Taylor and Francis. He serves as the Founder/Editor-in-Chief of World Police Encyclopedia (WPE) is forthcoming (Taylor and Francis, New York). He is a long-standing Human Rights Consultant in the United Nations. A former Chief of Police Dr. Das has traveled extensively as an international police researcher, UN Consultant, Visiting Professor and President of the IPES and written numerous books and articles on various aspects of policing.

Comparative Problems of Policing
2007 0-7734-5539-6
This work clearly renders, through selected interviews, the visions of police leaders, regarding the causes and approaches to be taken by police to the most pressing current events in the world. The freedom conferred to interviewees to probe into a series of topics and to voice their opinions supported by personal examples derived from their professional lives, is present throughout each interview. Transcriptions are reported in full, with supplied comments and notes.

Policing in Canada, India, Germany, Australia, Finland, and New Zealand. A Comparative Research Study
2005 0-7734-6037-3
A study of policing in six countries. These countries have some similarities but to a great extent are different. Several of these countries, India, New Zealand, Australia, and Canada have been influenced by the English approach to policing. Countries that were once colonies of the British Empire adopted the traditions and expectations of the British. Although these countries came under British rule there were differences in their culture and value system that were not eliminated by the British.

Policing in Finland
2006 0-7734-5708-9
Examines the reciprocal relationship between Finnish culture and Finnish policing. Cultural values, socio-economic and political backgrounds are used as the foundation to explain how the police work in Finland. Unlike many nations, the Finns consistently rank their police force as the most trustworthy among all the public institutions. In turn, the police benefit from a progressive culture in which tolerance, justice, and equality are highly practiced virtues. Through the lens of culture the authors focus on studying both the organization and the crafts of policing in Finland in contrast to police practices in the United States and elsewhere. The history, structure and functions of the Finnish police as well as the street practices are presented, vividly based on extensive fieldwork and personal interviews. This book will contribute to our understanding of why a society gets the police it deserves.