Horton, David M.

David M. Horton holds a Bachelor’s Master’s and Doctor of Philosophy degree in Criminal Justice, and is Professor and Director of the Baccalaureate degree programs in criminal justice, criminological theory, and forensic science at St. Edward’s University, Austin, Texas, where he has lectured for the past twenty-five years. Dr. Horton is the author of numerous books, and has engaged in post-doctoral research and study at Cambridge University, England, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, and at the Sorbonne, Paris, France. Additionally, he has served three two-year terms as a Presiding Municipal Court Judge in Texas, and is affiliated with the Texas Municipal Courts Education Center, where he has reviewed and edited various legal publications, and the Texas Bar Association’s Institute of Courts, where he has lectured on the historical development of the Texas court system.

Criminal Anthropological Articles of Cesare Lombroso Published in English Language Periodical Literature During the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries
2004 0-7734-6342-9


Pioneering Research in Forensic Science: Readings From the Primary Source Literature
2010 0-7734-4819-5
This work is the first forensic science anthology to consolidate landmark primary source documents into one volume.

Pioneers in Penology
2007 0-7734-5392-X
This two-volume work details the history of seminal penological thought and practice covering the period between 1557 and 1900. Based principally on primary source literature, the thirty-nine chapters of this anthology bring into sharp focus (1) the lives of the great European and American pioneering reformers in penology; (2) the most important pioneering experiments in prison and reformatory discipline; and (3) the histories and contributions of the major societies responsible for imparting impetus to prison reform in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The addition of endnotes and “Suggestions for Further Reading and Inquiry” sections following each chapter provides readers with a comprehensive and meticulously annotated collection of primary and secondary source materials from the rich history of penology. It is hoped that readers will be left with a just appreciation of the pioneers, institutions, and societies that constitute the knowledge base of modern penology, and that the period documents cited will inspire fresh scholarly inquiries that contribute to a more complete understanding and appreciation of the history of penological thought and practice.